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Home > Categories > Family and Relations > Parenting > View Advice  

Query from: S.Ram (ss), United States, 01/23/08
Topic: PARENTING      Submitted on: Ammas.com
Subject: diet chart for my 1 year old son

hi amma, my son will be 1 year old in 7 days.can you pls suggest me what kind of food to offer him from 1 year onwards? actually till now...am offering him , in the evening--milk/fruits at 8-8:30pm---mixed fruit cerelac/mixed vegetable cerelac

and before sleeping he will ask milk sometimes and in between the nights...he wakes up for milk again.. my MIL told me that..i should offer him rice in the night also..then only h stops asking millk during night times.. shall i offer my son same dal kichidi during night times/what kind of food i can offer him during night? i heard that acidity forms if we have dal during night.. so kindly help me,,,pls..tell me the foods i can offer my son..so that he wont wake up so many times for milk...and have a good sound sleep..

and also amma,guide me a healthy diet chart for my son pls... regards, S.Ram(ss)

Rate = 3 (Rated by 7 Council Members)
[ This query closed ]
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Response from: Indumukhi A.,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Happy birthday to your son!

It always feels like a real challenge to give a good advisor advice! But hopefully a few words from my own perspective can help your son's good health-- and help his hardworking mother get a good night's sleep!

Basically you have mentioned what you feed your son at night-- but remember that his waking at night for milk will not just be connected to what he eats right before bed but will actually be affected by his eating patterns over the course of the entire day. If you haven't already, this is a good time to get him on a regular daytime eating schedule. Have him eat a little when the family eats (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) and give him snacks during the day if he gets hungry (since his tummy is still so small it is good to eat snacks). Your son can eat the same foods you do, before they are salted or heavily spiced. Avoid the common habit of feeding him just biscuits or even cerelac/rice cereal, which are less filling and nutritious. Good, filling foods include well-cooked lentils and smashed beans, cut fruits, pieces of bread/roti, and whole milk. (Of course you should give rice and cereals too, but combining them with some of these will be better.)

If your son is not eating 3 meals a day now, you will notice a big difference in his sleeping patterns once he gets adjusted to it. Most kids naturally give up night feeding by around 12 months, so I wouldn't push it, but as you feed him more during the day you can reduce the amount of milk you give at night until he's not waking.

I never noticed that dal created acid problems during the night, but you can adjust once you see how your son digests.

As for the overall diet chart, I think the most important things to remember are:

Your instincts as his mom are probably correct-- just follow your common sense-- when he is hungry let him eat. Kids have natural hunger signals and they will normally stop eating when full.

There are a few basic guidelines doctors will give for kids this age, one of which is never feed reduced fat milk-- only whole milk for their developing brains. Of course, avoid too many sweets, salty food, or fatty foods.

But other than that, your soon-to-be one-year-old doesn't really need special foods. He can eat just what you eat, in smaller portions and cut up/mashed to the degree he needs. This is good because it can help the whole family eat nutritiously!

Finally it's important to remember that nobody ever fed their kid perfectly. We all gave biscuits here and there! In my opinion though the earlier you get your son off the cerelac or "baby foods" and onto the foods you'll want him to agree to eating as a toddler and throughout life, the easier your life will be (both at night now and in the future)-- and the healthier he will be!

Hope this helps. Again I do not think you need a diet chart, since between your intuition as his mom and your child's signals you two will figure out when he needs to eat, and how much, and as long as you have healthy food around the house-- rotis, dal, kitchri, fresh cut fruits and veggies, nut butters, whole grain bread and cereals, rice, cheese, yogurt, whole milk-- your son will get good nutrition.

My best wishes for your son's happy future!

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Response from: sitaraman gupta,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Give your son DAL,CHAPATI,RICE,VEGETABLES,CURD, FRUITS,MILK...I mean to say you have to avoid only spicy and fried things...be careful to prevent overfeeding. Use following Homoeopathic medicines for good growth Medicines to be given Cal.Phos.3X Dose: 1tab four times a day. (Buy a phial of medicine of the company named “Dr. Willmar Schwabe Pvt. Ltd.”)

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Response from: - Bahu -,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Dear,

this is a very good question as you precious one is at an age when solid and grown up food are almost upon him but not quite yet, while formula seems insufficient.

You did not mention his meals except dinner and milk. Here is a suggested plan, but you can vary it from day to day based on your judgement:

Early morning - milk with 1/2tsp honey (only organic and pure!)

Breakfast: baby oat cereal with mashed banana, a bit of sweet juice

Lunch: a little bit of rice mashed with 1-2 tsp liquid dal and some boiled veggies (no spices and no cabbage!), milk

Dinner: any variety cerelac, milk. It is better if you start giving rice and dal at lunchtime so that he has time to digest it well before sleep.

Bedtime: warm milk with a tiny amount of pure honey.

During the day make sure he drinks water, as well as milk.

Hope this helps - let me know.

Good luck!

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Response from: B Sreekanth Reddy,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
HI Ram, Baby's Diet After One Year

After the child is a year old, you should gradually let the child start getting used to foods made for the family, in terms of taste as well as consistency.

Milk

* Start giving cow or buffalo's milk from a glass 2-3 times a day. * If the child does not like milk, milk preparations like fruit salad in milk, curds and cheese should be given.

Fruits

* Inexpensive seasonal fruits should be given in abundance. * Whenever possible, avoid peeling the fruit's skin. Fruit skins are rich in vitamins and minerals * Encourage the child to have fresh fruit juices, but avoid sweetening it with sugar. * Avoid canned fruits and fruit juices; they have excessive sugar and contain preservatives.

Rice and Chapati

* Chapatis should be made from whole wheat. (Do not throw away the bran). * Polished rice is not as healthy as unpolished or par-boiled rice.

Vegetables

* Green, orange, red and yellow vegetables are essential. Scrape vegetables like potatoes instead of peeling them. * Use the water in which rice or vegetables have been boiled; it contains essential vitamins and minerals. * Do not overcook vegetables. If you want to make the vegetables soft, gently mash them with a spoon.

Dals, Eggs and other high protein foods

* Make sure foods high in protein (such as pulses or dals, gram, peanuts, peas, beans, eggs, fish, mutton, liver) are given. * Sprouted gram or moong is very nutritious.

Chocolates, cold drinks, coffee, etc

* Chocolates, cold drinks, flavoring agents, tea, coffee, etc. should be avoided as far as possible because they contain chemicals and caffeine that can be harmful to the child. * These filler foods can also ruin the child's appetite for nutritious meals.

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Response from: kjk jlkj,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: http://www.indiaparenting.com/diet/…
Hai S.Ram, Baby's Diet After One Year

After the child is a year old, you should gradually let the child start getting used to foods made for the family, in terms of taste as well as consistency.

Milk

Start giving cow or buffalo's milk from a glass 2-3 times a day. If the child does not like milk, milk preparations like fruit salad in milk, curds and cheese should be given.

Fruits

Inexpensive seasonal fruits should be given in abundance. Whenever possible, avoid peeling the fruit's skin. Fruit skins are rich in vitamins and minerals Encourage the child to have fresh fruit juices, but avoid sweetening it with sugar. Avoid canned fruits and fruit juices; they have excessive sugar and contain preservatives.

Rice and Chapati

Chapatis should be made from whole wheat. (Do not throw away the bran). Polished rice is not as healthy as unpolished or par-boiled rice.

Vegetables

Green, orange, red and yellow vegetables are essential. Scrape vegetables like potatoes instead of peeling them. Use the water in which rice or vegetables have been boiled; it contains essential vitamins and minerals. Do not overcook vegetables. If you want to make the vegetables soft, gently mash them with a spoon.

Dals, Eggs and other high protein foods

Make sure foods high in protein (such as pulses or dals, gram, peanuts, peas, beans, eggs, fish, mutton, liver) are given. Sprouted gram or moong is very nutritious.

Chocolates, cold drinks, coffee, etc

Chocolates, cold drinks, flavoring agents, tea, coffee, etc. should be avoided as far as possible because they contain chemicals and caffeine that can be harmful to the child. These filler foods can also ruin the child's appetite for nutritious meals.

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 16 Council Members)

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Response from: Uma Sen,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
hi ram, first advance wishes for ur child 1st birthday. First i would say its right time to change ur sons food habit. U can start giving him solid food by which u can slowly stop the habit of giving milk in night time. In morniigs u can give him nutrious health mix in semifluid form(sprouted&made into powdered form of all cereals&pulses for e.g ragi,wheat,green gram,chenna,rice) u can also mix cashew,badam for kids brain developmentto this in powdered form. For lunch u can go in for parupu with rice. FOR night u can give him cerlac with milk. IN EARLY MORNING &Evening time u provide HIM MILK him. IN between u can give him small amonunt of fruits,vegetables(PIECES OF APPLES,ORANGE,SLICES OF CARROT) provide him lot of water for easy digestion.(TIPS:DONT PROVIDE HIM MUCH WATER OR MILK AFTER DINNER.THIS WILL HELP IN LESS BEDWETTING)

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Response from: Ms saipriya r,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
hello S.Ram A healthy diet for children has enough nutrients for them to grow and have energy. The nutrients children need include protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. The amount of nutrients your child needs changes as he grows. His nutrient needs also depend on the amount of physical activity he does every day. A healthy diet also limits unhealthy foods that are high in fat and sugar.

A healthy diet helps a child to stay at a normal weight. Staying at a normal weight during childhood may keep a child from having certain health problems later in life. These health problems include obesity (being overweight), diabetes and heart disease.

food u should avoid giving ur child High-sugar, high-fat snack foods, juice, fruit drinks, soda, and milk between meals can decrease your child's appetite. This may cause him to eat less at mealtimes and not grow well. Your child may develop iron deficiency (dee-FISH-en-see) anemia (low levels of iron in his blood). Iron deficiency anemia can affect your child's growth and ability to learn. In some cases, your child may eat all his food during mealtime in addition to these snacks and drinks between meals. This could cause your child to gain too much weight.

Some foods may cause younger children (under three years old) to choke. Young children who do not have all their teeth cannot chew and swallow easily. Some of these foods include hot dogs or chunks of meat, large pieces of fruit or vegetables, potato chips, hard candy, nuts, and popcorn. Feed your toddler a variety of foods from all the food groups. Serve portions (amounts) that are right for your toddler. One tablespoon of each food for each year of your child's age is a good way to decide how much to give him. For example, if your child is two years old, give him two tablespoons of each food at mealtime. Serve more food if your child is still hungry. Your child will tell you if he is still hungry or he has eaten enough. Do not force your child to eat.

Limit the amount of fruit juice your toddler drinks to four to six ounces (one-half to three-fourths of a cup) each day. Toddlers who drink too much juice may not drink enough water and milk. Drinking too much juice may also cause a child to get full and not want to eat solid foods.

The number of servings that your child needs from each food group depends on his age. Ask your caregiver, a dietitian, or a nutritionist how many servings your child needs. Below you will find a list of food groups and serving sizes for children.

Grain Group: Children should eat six to eleven servings each day.

One slice of bread, half of a hamburger or hot dog bun, or half of an English muffin or bagel.

One ounce or about one cup of ready-to-eat cereal.

Half of a cup of cooked cereal, rice or pasta.

One 7-inch flour or corn tortilla.

Two to three graham cracker squares.

One 4-inch pancake or pita bread.

Vegetable Group: Children should eat three to five servings each day.

One cup of raw, leafy vegetables, or one cup of bean or vegetable soup.

Half of a cup of chopped raw or cooked vegetables.

Three-fourths of a cup of vegetable juice.

Half of a cup of tomato or spaghetti sauce.

One medium baked potato.

Ten regular size french fries.

Fruit Group: Children should eat two to four servings each day.

One medium apple, banana, peach, pear, or nectarine.

Half of a cup of chopped, cooked or canned fruit.

Three-fourths of a cup of fruit juice.

Half of a cup of berries or watermelon pieces.

Milk Group: Children should eat two to three servings each day.

One cup of milk or yogurt.

One and a half ounces of natural cheese (such as cheddar).

Two ounces of processed cheese (such as American cheese).

Half of a cup of cottage cheese, ice cream, frozen yogurt, or pudding.

Meat Group: Children should eat two servings each day (one serving equals two to three ounces).

Two to three ounces of cooked lean meat, fish, or poultry.

One egg (one egg equals one ounce).

One cup of cooked dried beans or tofu (one cup equals two ounces).

Two tablespoons of peanut butter (two tablespoons equal one ounce).

One-half of a cup of drained canned salmon or tuna (one-half of a cup equals two ounces).

One soy burger patty (one patty equals one ounce).

Provide healthy meals and snacks for your child. Breakfast is an important meal for your child. Eating breakfast may help your child to pay attention in school and eat healthier throughout the day. Prepare healthy meals with foods from all the different food groups. Buy healthy snack foods for your children. Good snack ideas are dry cereal, with or without milk, crackers with cheese, fruit, raw vegetables, yogurt, popcorn, and pretzels.

Make meal and snack times calm and fun for your child. Turn the television off and have your child sit at the table to eat. It is a good idea to eat meals and snacks with your child. Children like to eat the same kind of food they see their parents eating. If your child sees you eat healthy food, he will learn to like healthy food too.

Your child will be very hungry on some days and want to eat less on other days. Your child will be more active on some days than others, and he will have growth spurts at times. Your child will want to eat more during these times. As long as your child eats a variety of foods during the week, it is OK if he eats more on some days and less on other days.

Do not use food as a reward for eating all of a meal, or for doing other good things. This teaches your child to eat for reasons other than being hungry. Find other rewards that are not food, such as stickers, playing with a special toy, or doing a special activity together. Praise your child's good eating habits.

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Response from: Lathaa Manavalan,   
Council Member on Ask Agent
Source: google
Advanced Happy Birthday Wishes to your son. I suggest you to gift him with morzart cds. He will sleep well too. Parents also can hear it. Your son still need approximately 500-600ml of breast milk per day to help satisfy their nutritional requirements and thirst

Give a balanced diet by adding below foods.

Starchy Foods-bread, rice, other cereals, yam and potatoes Include at least one food from this group at each meal time (these make good snacks too). Normal adult texture. Discourage pastry as it contains calories but little else.. Remember children have small stomachs so avoid too much fibre like wholemeal pasta or brown rice (use the white varieties or mix some wholemeal in with the white).

Meat, fish, egg and other alternatives Include at least 1 (animal source) - 2 servings (vegetable source) from this group per day. Choose iron-rich foods like lean meat, oily fish, and pulses.

Milk and dairy foods Include 2-3 servings from this group per day. Use full-fat dairy products as your child needs the calories. Still include a minimum of 350mls per day of breast milk, formula or whole cows’ milk after 12 months.

Fruit and vegetables Include at least one food from this group at each meal time, at least five child portions per day including one citrus. Adult texture [as an adult would eat it]. All types of fresh, frozen, canned (in fruit juice) or dried. A suitable portion is half an apple or pear, small banana, 40g of carrots, broccoli, sweet corn, green beans, peas, tomatoes, 25ml apple or orange juice in a cup diluted with water at meal times (not as a main drink). (This is a recommendation from Sian Porter based on approximately half an adult portion).

Eating sugary foods frequently can cause tooth decay. Discourage high fat, high salt savoury snacks. Keep these foods as occasional treats. Try not to let your child fill up on drinks: keep them to the end of meals and avoid at least an hour before.

3 meals and 2 - 3 snacks per day - so breakfast, lunch and dinner are the meals and give snacks mid-morning, mid-afternoon, and perhaps before bed.

Approximate serving sizes for toddler food are one serving is the size of your toddler's palm of the hand. For a main meal, there would be one serving of protein (eg. meat, eggs), one serving of carbohydrate (eg. bread, pasta, potato) and 2 servings of vegetables, so the equivalent of 4 servings which would be the size of 4 palms of your toddler's hand. Your toddler does not need salt on her food. You may need to cook food separately if the family is used to salted food. Toddlers can't digest wholegrain breads and so should only be given white bread until they are 15 months of age. Don't give nuts to young children under 5 years of age- they can choke or the nuts can go into the airway.

Once the child is eating the cereal porridge well, mixed foods including cooked cereal, pulse and vegetable(s) could be given to the child. Most traditional foods given to infants in different parts of the country are examples of mixed foods like khichidi, dalia, suji kheer, upma, idli, dokhla, bhaat-bhaji etc. Sometimes traditional foods are given after a little modification so as to make the food more suitable for the child. For instance, mashed idli with a little oil and sugar is a good complementary food for the infant. Similarly bhaat can be made more nutritious by adding some cooked dal or vegetable to it. Khichidi can be made more nutritious by adding one or two vegetables in it while cooking. These are sattu like preparations which is quite familiar in the Indian community. One can take three parts of any cereal (rice/wheat) or millet (ragi, bajra jowar), one part of any pulse (moong/channa/arhar) and half part of groundnuts or white til, if available. The food items should be roasted separately, ground, mixed properly and stored in airtight containers. For feeding, take two tablespoons of this infant food mix, add boiled hot water or milk, sugar or jaggery and oil/ghee and mix well. Cooked and mashed carrot, pumpkin or green leafy vegetables could be added to the porridge, if available. The infant can be fed with this food whenever freshly cooked food is not available in the family. The infant food mix could also be made into preparations like halwa, burfi, upma, dalia etc, and given to the child. Energy density foods can be given as below i) By adding a teaspoonful of oil or ghee in every feed. Fat is a concentrated source of energy and substantially increases energy content of food without increasing the bulk. The false belief in the community that a young child cannot digest fat has to be dispelled with by informing that a young infant digests fat present in breast milk and all other foods like cereals and pulses and that there is no reason to feel that a child can not digest visible fat when added to food. ii) By adding sugar or jaggery to the child’s food. Children need more energy and hence adequate amounts of sugar or jaggery should be added to child’s food. iii) By giving malted foods. Malting reduces viscosity of the foods and hence child can eat more at a time. Malting is germinating whole grain cereal or pulse, drying it after germination and grinding. Infant Food Mixes prepared after malting the cereal or pulse will provide more energy to the child. Flours of malted food when mixed with other foods help in reducing the viscosity of that food. Amylase Rich Flour (ARF) is the scientific name given to flours of malted foods and must be utilised in infant foods. iv) By feeding thick mixtures. Thin gruels do not provide enough energy. A young infant particularly during 6-9 months requires thick but smooth mixtures as hard pieces in the semi-solid food may cause difficulty if swallowed. The semi-solid foods for young infants can be passed through a sieve by pressing with a ladle to ensure that the mixed food is smooth and uniform without any big pieces or lumps.

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Response from: Deepa Shyam,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Dear Ram,

By the time the child is one year old, he or she is ready to eat what the family eats. Its perfectly okay to give dal with rice as dinner and finish it with curd rice ,if you have yogurt regularly. Feed this to the child around 7 to 7.30 pm and around 10 or 10.30 if only your child requires give him milk.

Any dish that you make for the family must also be given to the child . This will help him be aware of different kinds of taste and so as he grows up will not be fussy about food. As long as the food is not too oily or spicy, it can be given to the child.

Also all kinds of fruits, right from apple to pineapple to mango can be given in reasonable quantities to the child .

Breakfast: Common Indian breakfasts like idli/dosai , pongal, upma. Continental breakfast like bread with cheese spread and half to one apple sliced into small pieces.

After one hour: a good glass of milk or a bottle of milk.

around 11am: one milk biscuit or carrot sticks (they will love this when they are teething) or any fruit.

Lunch:If Indian lunch, mashed dhal with rice and any vegetable. (please do not mash the vegetable too much, the child must be aware of the texture of the vegetable to enjoy the difference). a pot of yogurt.

around 3pm a bottle of milk or juice

around 5 pm a bottle of milk or a biscuit or cheese sticks or triangle cheese.

around 7-7.30 Dinner with dhal and rice or vegetable and rice and finish off with yogurt rice.

around 10-30 Milk , if only needed by the child.

Experiment all kinds of food with the one year baby . they love to try everything.

Good luck and happy parenting

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Response from: parameshwari nagavelli,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: http://www.indiaparenting.com/…
hai ram,

After the child is a year old, you should gradually let the child start getting used to foods made for the family, in terms of taste as well as consistency.

Milk

Start giving cow or buffalo's milk from a glass 2-3 times a day. If the child does not like milk, milk preparations like fruit salad in milk, curds and cheese should be given.

Fruits

Inexpensive seasonal fruits should be given in abundance. Whenever possible, avoid peeling the fruit's skin. Fruit skins are rich in vitamins and minerals Encourage the child to have fresh fruit juices, but avoid sweetening it with sugar. Avoid canned fruits and fruit juices; they have excessive sugar and contain preservatives.

Rice and Chapati

Chapatis should be made from whole wheat. (Do not throw away the bran). Polished rice is not as healthy as unpolished or par-boiled rice.

Vegetables

Green, orange, red and yellow vegetables are essential. Scrape vegetables like potatoes instead of peeling them. Use the water in which rice or vegetables have been boiled; it contains essential vitamins and minerals. Do not overcook vegetables. If you want to make the vegetables soft, gently mash them with a spoon.

Dals, Eggs and other high protein foods

Make sure foods high in protein (such as pulses or dals, gram, peanuts, peas, beans, eggs, fish, mutton, liver) are given. Sprouted gram or moong is very nutritious.

Chocolates, cold drinks, coffee, etc

Chocolates, cold drinks, flavoring agents, tea, coffee, etc. should be avoided as far as possible because they contain chemicals and caffeine that can be harmful to the child. These filler foods can also ruin the child's appetite for nutritious meals. for baby food reciepes u can see the link below http://www.indiaparenting.com/diet/…

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 16 Council Members)

 
Response from: hari sri,   
Featured Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
hello ram, u don't worry about him for disturbing u in the night time for milk ,it is usual with all babies.then u give dal and rasam with some potato,carrot smashed in it with ghee during noon time for lunch,its better to give cerelac or some other food like that during night time. he is only one year old so as time passaes u reduce the no:of time feeding milk during night time ,that is u feed him only he looks like hungry otherwise if he is sleeping well don,t feed him. then morning u give iddily dipped in milk or curd.then after 2 hours u give fresh carrot juice.this can be made by :cut a carrot into pieces then make it into a paste in the mixie then filter it add some water and sugarand feed through the feeding bottle,this is good for health and avoids costipation.then after 2 hours feed him lunch .u can feed milk inbetween whever needed.make the habit of drinking of water.then after noon time give some fruits like banana,grapes,pomegranate,apple.don't smash the food this will make him to cultivate the habbit to swallow only smooth foods, then give some cucumber or fruit pieces in his hand and make him to eat but u have to keep an eye on him.give boiled potato etc.these children take only one or two pieces thats more than enough so don't force to eat more at a time.give biscuits in his hand when he is playing he may spread some things but do't worry this will make him to eat by himself.make the habbit to take all fruits and vegetables . u can also give some soup any time.

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 16 Council Members)

 
Response from: Dr. Sindu.,   
Council Member on NDTV
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Dear Ram, I am so happy that, being a father you are taking much care of your son. very good . keep it up.

IN my experience , As he is only one year old its better to give rice only once daily. feed him cooked rice at noon. after that you can try fresh juice( better to give juice prepared at home rather than the ready made one.) around 7 o' clock you can give him something heavy like boiled and mashed banana,( if its available there.) It will take some time to digest and he wont ask more food at night. Before going to bed give milk. Sometimes at night baby's wake up and cry without any reason. he may not be crying due to hunger. give him water and if crying doesnt stop give him milk.( if possible better to give breast milk at night.)

After the child is a year old, you should gradually let the child start getting used to foods made for the family, in terms of taste as well as consistency.

It is important that a child's diet should be both good in quality as well as adequate in quantity. If his diet is deficient in nutrients and energy, it can adversely affect his weight gain and body growth. The child's diet should supply him with proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals and other nutrients in adequate quantities.

Your child would receive a proper balanced diet if he eats a meal consisting of food items like: chapatis, bread, rice, breakfast cereals, maize, potatos, dals, beans, poultry and meats, milk, cheese etc. It is important to mix various kinds of foods so that his requirements of nutrients would be met. It is important for you to ensure that your child eats food in adequate quantities. Considering a child's small appetite, it is advisable that his food should be rich in nutritive value and that he should eat more often during the course of the day. here is a list of food you can try for your baby.........

Milk

Start giving fresh milk-cow or buffalo's milk from a glass 2-3 times a day. if his mother is breast feeding him continue that at night. dont use long life milk. always try to use fresh milk. is getting breast If the child does not like milk, milk preparations like fruit salad in milk, curds and cheese should be given.

Milk and milk products are an important source of energy, proteins, calcium and vitamins. A child must have about ½ litre of milk products per day.

Fruits

Inexpensive seasonal fruits should be given in abundance. Whenever possible, avoid peeling the fruit's skin. Fruit skins are rich in vitamins and minerals Encourage the child to have fresh fruit juices, but avoid sweetening it with sugar. Avoid canned fruits and fruit juices; they have excessive sugar and contain preservatives.

Rice and Chapati

Chapatis should be made from whole wheat. (Do not throw away the bran). Polished rice is not as healthy as unpolished or par-boiled rice.

Vegetables

Green, orange, red and yellow vegetables are essential. Scrape vegetables like potatoes instead of peeling them. Use the water in which rice or vegetables have been boiled; it contains essential vitamins and minerals. Do not overcook vegetables. If you want to make the vegetables soft, gently mash them with a spoon.

Dals, Eggs and other high protein foods

Make sure foods high in protein (such as pulses or dals, gram, peanuts, peas, beans, eggs, fish, mutton, liver) are given. Sprouted gram or moong is very nutritious.

Things you should avoid

Chocolates, cold drinks, flavoring agents, tea, coffee, etc. should be avoided as far as possible because they contain chemicals and caffeine that can be harmful to the child. These filler foods can also ruin the child's appetite for nutritious meals.

Baby's who do not eat enough at a time should be offered food every 2-3 hours. However, do not force your child to eat.

If your child is fit and healthy, and is growing and gaining weight as expected, do not fuss about his eating.

hope all your doubts are cleared.

Advance Birthday greetings for your son

Dr.Sindu

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Response from: Raghu Nandan,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Only diluted food items which are easy to digest and mother's milk.

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Response from: jeshma Mohandas,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
u can give him any food after 1 year.dal steamed is very good.idili,dosa,saltmango tree,rice

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Response from: babita ramakrishna,   
Featured Member on Ask Agent
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Its so surprising that you are thinking your son(1yr) will get acidity and all.And i tell you he will get gas if he is starving for a long time as his stomouch is not full. And if you dont feel like giving him dal at night give him some rice with some vegetable curry. Or you can just cook some rice and vegetable with salt and give him. From one year he should be able to eat the food what you all people will eat(but not that spicy as we take). Add more fruits, vegetables and green leaves in his diet immediatly as later they may not like it much. and if you are non-vegetarian start giving him soup and try out some pieces cooked seperately for him. and you can very well give fish to him. you can try fish fry kids will love it. Moring break-fast and a glass of milk... before lunch one more glass of milk if he likes to take else give him food before 1pm. At three or four give him some bread or biscuits or some fruits and one more glass of milk. Then give him food(rice) at 7pm. then he will take one glass of milk before he goes to sleep. then he wont wake up at nights cause these all will keep him full and content so he will have sound sleep. All The best.

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Response from: bharati ,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Hiii mam my advance wishes to ur son for his birthday. u can give him smashed apple[boiled] rasam rice. dal soup N boiled n smashed vegetables which is easily digestable for him. boiled n smashed potatoes in fresh thick curd. tomato soup. clear soup n curd rice. along with this introudce him side by side noodles n find out his taste n try to give him in the form of semi liquid type n banana dalia kichadi, dal rice with ghee. these u can try. all the best.

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Response from: M Manju,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Hi Ram, Dal is a nutrient food for a baby .It is rich in protein.You can opt it for ur baby. For your info: Children have a high calorie and nutrient need, but their stomachs are small. Offer your child frequent snacks, and include some less "bulky" foods like refined grains and fruit juices. Limit juices, however, since children may fill up on them, preferring their sweetness to other foods.

Some foods, such as veggie hot-dogs, carrot sticks, peanuts, and grapes, may present a choking hazard. Be sure to cut foods into small pieces and encourage children to chew their food well before swallowing.

Calorie needs vary from child to child. The following guidelines are general ones. Recommended Servings: Ages 1 to 4 years

Breads, cereals, and grains: 6 or more servings; a serving equals 1/2 to 1 slice of bread; 1/4 to 1/2 cup cooked cereal, grain, or pasta; 1/2 to 1 cup ready-to-eat cereal

Legumes, nuts, and seeds: 2 or more servings; a serving equals 1/4 to 1/2 cup cooked beans, tofu, tempeh, or TVP; 1 1/2 to 3 ounces meat analogue; 1 to 2 tablespoons nuts, seeds, nut or seed butter

Fortified soy milk: 3 servings; a serving equals 1 cup fortified soy milk, infant formula, or breast milk

Vegetables: 2 or more servings; a serving equals 1/4 to 1/2 cup cooked or 1/2 to 1 cup raw vegetables

Fruits: 3 or more servings: a serving equals 1/4 to 1/2 cup canned fruit; 1/2 cup juice; 1 medium fruit

Fats: 3 servings; a serving equals 1 teaspoon margarine or oil refer: http://www.thevegetariansite.com/ve… Home made food are more nutrious than tinned foods.So give him foods like: boiling half a cup of rice, one chicken breast(small), a potato(small),a cup of papaya or other vegetables , a teaspoon of edible oil, a pinch of salt. boil it for 30 minutes or until everything is boiled. then put it in a blender and blend. give this to the kids. spoon feed them. it might be difficult cause they wont have it first but it is nutritious. you can add lentils, other veggies too. but slowly and in small quantities. More info: 1 YEAR OF AGE

After a baby is 1-year old, whole milk may replace breast milk or formula. Children under the age of 2 should not be given low-fat milk (2%, 1%, or skim) as they need the additional calories from fat to ensure proper growth and development.

Children under the age of 1 should not be given whole milk as it has been shown to cause low blood counts. Cheese, cottage cheese, and yogurt, however, may be given in small amounts.

The 1-year-old child should be getting much of their nutrition from meats, fruits and vegetables, breads and grains, and the dairy group, especially whole milk.

Providing a variety of foods will help to ensure enough vitamins and minerals. Toddlers do not grow as rapidly as babies do, so their nutritional needs relative to their size decrease during the second year of life. Although they continue to gain weight, they no longer double their weight as infants do.

Keep in mind, however, that toddlers are becoming more and more active as they learn to crawl and walk. Toddlers and small children will usually eat only small amounts at one time, but will eat frequently (4 - 6 times) throughout the day, so snacking is strongly encouraged.

Feeding Tips:

* Feeding solids too early is not recommended and can result in overfeeding. * Offer only one new food at a time. Offer the new foods for a few days. Watch for allergic reactions (hives, vomiting, diarrhea). * Do not feed solids in a bottle. * If your child dislikes the new food, try giving it again later.

SAFETY FIRST

* Feed the baby directly from the jar only if you use the entire jar contents, otherwise use a dish to prevent contamination with food-borne illness. * Opened containers of baby's food should be covered and stored in a refrigerator for no longer than 2 days. * Use a small spoon to feed the baby. * A baby put to bed with a bottle (milk, fruit juice, or sweetened beverage) can develop bottle mouth, resulting in tooth decay. Use plain water if a bottle is necessary. * Avoid foods that may cause the baby to choke -- popcorn, nuts, potato chips, whole kernel corn, berries, grapes, hot dogs, raw vegetables, raisins, dry flake cereals.

OTHER TIPS

* Water can be offered between feedings. * Feeding sweets or sweetened beverages is not recommended because they will spoil the appetite and contribute to tooth decay. * Salt, sugar, and strong spices are not recommended. * Caffeine products are not recommended (soft drinks, coffee, tea, chocolate). * A fussy baby may need attention, rather than food. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/… For more recipes: http://recipestoday.com/resources/a… www.healingourchildren.net/infant_c… You can try variety of recipes for your baby as he tastes variety and choose his own tastes and needs.

Rate = 3 (Rated by 15 Council Members)

 
 
 
 
 
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