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Home > Categories > Travel and Transportation > USA > View Advice  

Query from: Anonymous, United States, 05/22/11
Topic: USA      Submitted on: AnswerPod.com
Subject: Child's car seat in Tennessee

Please provide your answer WITHOUT using links or attaching images, docs, etc. (You must still give your source, however).
Attention Council Members: If this query is in the wrong category, be sure to put it in the appropriate category.

Here is the question: When can children stop using car seats in Tennessee?

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 2 Council Members)
[ This query closed ]
random/tn_n-brook.jpg
Response from: Nagarajan S,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: http://www.stjude.org…
According to Tennessee state law, Children who are 8 years or younger or who are shorter than 4 feet 9 inches must sit in a child passenger restraint system, also known as a child safety seat. A child safety seat is an infant seat, convertible car seat or other car seat, or a booster seat. The kind of seat you need depends on your child’s size and age. These are the rules for car seats in Tennessee: 1) Children who are younger than 1 year and children of any age who weigh 20 pounds or less must sit in a rear-facing car seat that meets federal safety standards for motor vehicles. A rear-facing car seat gives your child the most protection for the head, neck, and spine. If your vehicle has a back seat, the car seat must be placed there. Never place a rear-facing car seat in the front seat when there is an active airbag on the passenger side. Some vehicles have an on/off switch for the airbag. If this is the case in your vehicle and you must use the front seat, be sure to switch the airbag off. 2) Children ages 1 through 3 who weigh more than 20 pounds are required to use a forward-facing car seat that meets federal safety standards for motor vehicles. If your vehicle has a back seat, the car seat must be placed there. 3) Children ages 4 through 8 who are shorter than 4 feet 9 inches must use a belt-positioning booster seat that meets federal safety standards for motor vehicles. This type of seat simply raises your child to the right height to let him safely use the seatbelt of your vehicle. The seatbelt holds in both your child and the seat. The vehicle seatbelt should be adjusted to fit your child when he is sitting in the booster seat. If your vehicle has a back seat, the booster seat must be placed there.

Unless the law should amend properly the children will not stop using car seats in Tennessee.

Source: http://www.stjude.org…

Rate = 3.5 (Rated by 1 Council Member)

Thank this advisor   
 
Response from: ritu j,   
Registered Member on Ask Agent
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Hi Anonymous,

Tennessee state law requires that all people riding in vehicles must wear safety belts. Children who are 8 years or younger or who are shorter than 4 feet 9 inches must sit in a child passenger restraint system, also known as a child safety seat. A child safety seat is an infant seat, convertible car seat or other car seat, or a booster seat. The kind of seat you need depends on your child’s size and age. These are the rules for car seats in Tennessee: Children who are younger than 1 year and children of any age who weigh 20 pounds or less must sit in a rear-facing car seat that meets federal safety standards for motor vehicles. A rear-facing car seat gives your child the most protection for the head, neck, and spine. If your vehicle has a back seat, the car seat must be placed there. Never place a rear-facing car seat in the front seat when there is an active airbag on the passenger side. Some vehicles have an on/off switch for the airbag. If this is the case in your vehicle and you must use the front seat, be sure to switch the airbag off. Children ages 1 through 3 who weigh more than 20 pounds are required to use a forward-facing car seat that meets federal safety standards for motor vehicles. If your vehicle has a back seat, the car seat must be placed there. Children ages 4 through 8 who are shorter than 4 feet 9 inches must use a belt-positioning booster seat that meets federal safety standards for motor vehicles. This type of seat simply raises your child to the right height to let him safely use the seatbelt of your vehicle. The seatbelt holds in both your child and the seat. The vehicle seatbelt should be adjusted to fit your child when he is sitting in the booster seat. If your vehicle has a back seat, the booster seat must be placed there. If your child has special needs and cannot ride safely in a standard child safety seat, then you can use a special seat. The seat must be professionally made and must meet the federal standards that apply to your child’s age, height, and weight. A child who is age 8 or younger cannot use a lap belt or shoulder seatbelt alone. If your child uses a specially made seat, the driver of the vehicle must always carry a copy of a doctor’s note for the seat and be ready to present the note if asked. I hope this is helpful.

Rate = 3.5 (Rated by 1 Council Member)

 
 
 
 
 
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