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Query from: Anonymous, United States, 03/08/11
Topic: TRIVIA      Submitted on: AnswerPod.com
Subject: Common Knowledge

Please provide your answer WITHOUT using links or attaching images, docs, etc. (You must still give your source, however).
Attention Council Members: If this query is in the wrong category, be sure to put it in the appropriate category.

Here is the question: Why is the sky blue?

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 5 Council Members)
[ This query closed ]
random/tn_n-sea-coconut.jpg
Response from: jeshma Mohandas,   
Featured Member on Ammas.com
Source: http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/sk…
The blue color of the sky is due to Rayleigh scattering. As light moves through the atmosphere, most of the longer wavelengths pass straight through. Little of the red, orange and yellow light is affected by the air.

However, much of the shorter wavelength light is absorbed by the gas molecules. The absorbed blue light is then radiated in different directions. It gets scattered all around the sky. Whichever direction you look, some of this scattered blue light reaches you. Since you see the blue light from everywhere overhead, the sky looks blue.

As you look closer to the horizon, the sky appears much paler in color. To reach you, the scattered blue light must pass through more air. Some of it gets scattered away again in other directions. Less blue light reaches your eyes. The color of the sky near the horizon appears paler or white.

Rate = 3 (Rated by 2 Council Members)

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Response from: KG Anand,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: Internet
The blue color of the sky is due to Rayleigh scattering. As light moves through the atmosphere, most of the longer wavelengths pass straight through. Little of the red, orange and yellow light is affected by the air.

However, much of the shorter wavelength light is absorbed by the gas molecules. The absorbed blue light is then radiated in different directions. It gets scattered all around the sky. Whichever direction you look, some of this scattered blue light reaches you. Since you see the blue light from everywhere overhead, the sky looks blue.

As you look closer to the horizon, the sky appears much paler in color. To reach you, the scattered blue light must pass through more air. Some of it gets scattered away again in other directions. Less blue light reaches your eyes. The color of the sky near the horizon appears paler or white.

Rate = 3.5 (Rated by 2 Council Members)

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Response from: shiva sakthi,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: http://www.coolquiz.com/trivia/expl…
Hai,

The sky appears blue to us on a clear day, because the atoms of nitrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere separate the suns white light into its many colors, and scatter them throughout the atmosphere.

The wavelength of the blue light scatters better than the rest, predominates over the other colors in the light spectrum, and makes the sky appear blue to us.

The scientific name for this phenomenon is the Tyndall effect, more commonly known as Rayleigh scattering.

Rate = 4 (Rated by 1 Council Member)

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