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Query from: Anonymous, United States, 09/22/10
Topic: TRIVIA      Submitted on: AnswerPod.com
Subject: HOW MUCH KEY FORCE CAN A HUMAN BODY WITHSTAND

Please provide your answer WITHOUT using links or attaching images, docs, etc. (You must still give your source, however).
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Rate = 3 (Rated by 5 Council Members)
[ This query closed ]
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Response from: jeshma Mohandas,   
Featured Member on Ammas.com
Source: csel.eng.ohio-state.edu/voshell/gforce.pdf
The human body can tolerate a great deal .... His team showed that humans could withstand forces in excess of 30G ...... Awareness is the key.G means The Standard Acceleration of Gravity (G)As terrestrial inhabitants of the Earth, the human body is used to a particular force: gravity. The forces felt as a body accelerates and decelerates canbe described in multiples of gravity, or G. A G-force is simply a descriptive measure of acceleration. When stationary, the force felt by Earth’s gravity is 1G, however when a body undergoes a change in speed and direction, that force increases in proportion to the rate of change

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 6 Council Members)

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Response from: KG Anand,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: Internet and science
Human tolerances depend on the magnitude of the g-force, the length of time it is applied, the direction it acts, the location of application, and the posture of the body. The human body is flexible and deformable, particularly the softer tissues. A hard slap on the face may briefly impose hundreds of g locally but not produce any real damage; a constant 16 g for a minute, however, may be deadly.

Vertical axis g-force Aircraft, in particular, exert g-force along the axis aligned with the spine. This causes significant variation in blood pressure along the length of the subject's body, which limits the maximum g-forces that can be tolerated.

In aircraft, g-forces are often towards the feet, which forces blood away from the head; this causes problems with the eyes and brain in particular. As g-forces increase a Brownout can occur, where the vision loses hue. If g-force is increased further tunnel vision will appear, and then at still higher g, loss of vision, while consciousness is maintained. This is termed "blacking out". Beyond this point loss of consciousness will occur, sometimes known as "G-LOC" ("loc" stands for "loss of consciousness"). Beyond G-LOC, if g-forces are not quickly reduced, death can occur.

While tolerance varies, with g-forces towards the feet, a typical person can handle about 5 g (49m/s²) before g-loc, but through the combination of special g-suits and efforts to strain muscles-both of which act to force blood back into the brain-modern pilots can typically handle 9 g (88 m/s²) sustained (for a period of time) or more.

Resistance to "negative" or upward g's, which drive blood to the head, is much lower. This limit is typically in the -2 to -3 g (-20 m/s² to -30 m/s²) range. The subject's vision turns red, referred to as a red out. This is probably because capillaries in the eyes swell or burst under the increased blood pressure.

Horizontal axis g-force The human body is better at surviving g-forces that are perpendicular to the spine. In general when the acceleration is forwards, so that the g-force pushes the body backwards (colloquially known as "eyeballs in") a much higher tolerance is shown than when the acceleration is backwards, and the g-force is pushing the body forwards ("eyeballs out") since blood vessels in the retina appear more sensitive in the latter direction.

Early experiments showed that untrained humans were able to tolerate 17 g eyeballs-in (compared to 12 g eyeballs-out) for several minutes without loss of consciousness or apparent long-term harm.

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 4 Council Members)

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Response from: shiva sakthi,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-forc…
Hai,

Human tolerances depend on the magnitude of the g-force, the length of time it is applied, the direction it acts, the location of application, and the posture of the body.

The human body is flexible and deformable, particularly the softer tissues. A hard slap on the face may briefly impose hundreds of g locally but not produce any real damage; a constant 16 g for a minute, however, may be deadly. When vibration is experienced, relatively low peak g levels can be severely damaging if they are at the resonance frequency of organs and connective tissues.

To some degree, g-tolerance can be trainable, and there is also considerable variation in innate ability between individuals. In addition, some illnesses, particularly cardiovascular problems, reduce g-tolerance.

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 3 Council Members)

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Response from: Dr.Anjna Agarwal,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Human tolerances depend on the magnitude of the g-force (The g-force of an object is its equal to its acceleration relative to free-fall. This means that an object on earth that is not falling or rising (relative to gravity) is experiencing 1g (0g being weightless). This in turn also means that 1g is equal to your weight etc ), the length of time it is applied, the direction it acts, the location of application, and the posture of the body. The human body is flexible and deformable, particularly the softer tissues. A hard slap on the face may briefly impose hundreds of g locally but not produce any real damage; a constant 16 g for a minute, however, may be deadly. Vertical axis g-force

Aircraft, in particular, exert g-force along the axis aligned with the spine. This causes significant variation in blood pressure along the length of the subject's body, which limits the maximum g-forces that can be tolerated.

In aircraft, g-forces are often towards the feet, which forces blood away from the head; this causes problems with the eyes and brain in particular. As g-forces increase a Brownout can occur, where the vision loses hue. If g-force is increased further tunnel vision will appear, and then at still higher g, loss of vision, while consciousness is maintained. This is termed "blacking out". Beyond this point loss of consciousness will occur, sometimes known as "G-LOC" ("loc" stands for "loss of consciousness"). Beyond G-LOC, if g-forces are not quickly reduced, death can occur.

While tolerance varies, with g-forces towards the feet, a typical person can handle about 5 g (49m/s²) before g-loc, but through the combination of special g-suits and efforts to strain muscles-both of which act to force blood back into the brain-modern pilots can typically handle 9 g (88 m/s²) sustained (for a period of time) or more.

Resistance to "negative" or upward g's, which drive blood to the head, is much lower. This limit is typically in the -2 to -3 g (-20 m/s² to -30 m/s²) range. The subject's vision turns red, referred to as a red out. This is probably because capillaries in the eyes swell or burst under the increased blood pressure. Horizontal axis g-force

The human body is better at surviving g-forces that are perpendicular to the spine. In general when the acceleration is forwards, so that the g-force pushes the body backwards (colloquially known as "eyeballs in") a much higher tolerance is shown than when the acceleration is backwards, and the g-force is pushing the body forwards ("eyeballs out") since blood vessels in the retina appear more sensitive in the latter direction.

Early experiments showed that untrained humans were able to tolerate 17 g eyeballs-in (compared to 12 g eyeballs-out) for several minutes without loss of consciousness or apparent long-term harm.

Rate = 2 (Rated by 3 Council Members)

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