Invite friends
I want  answers   advisors   relevant links   my network
Search 
For


How it works
  MEMBERS LOGIN
EMAIL ADDRESS  
PASSWORD  
 
Register!          Forgot password?


CATEGORY : PEOPLE
All People Advice
Unanswered Queries
FileAgent Document Exchange
Council Members
Advisor Rankings
Top Rated Advisors
NameAsk Me Rate (in AA$)
Pranab Paul $500.00   
jeshma Mohandas $25.00   
Ak Narang N/A
bhaskara ramam g N/A
Anoop C S $1.00   
Kranthi Kumar $10.00   
Lathaa Manavalan $50.00   
C. Raj, United Kingd $1,000.00   
Geetha Gopakumar $30.00   
Ammas.com, Ltd N/A
More Advisors...

Home > Categories > Society and Culture > People > View Advice  

Query from: meenakshi jeganathan, india, 02/23/07
Topic: PEOPLE      Submitted on: Ammas.com
Subject: Srilankan Traditional Dress

Can anyone please tell me about Srilankan people traditional costume? (for both men and women). Please answer me soon as it is really critical.

Rate = 3 (Rated by 6 Council Members)
[ This query closed ]
random/horses.jpeg
Response from: Ashok Rajagopalan,   
Registered Member on Ask Agent
http://www.viator-publications.com/… http://www.costumes.org/HISTORY/rac… http://srilanka.tamu.edu/pics_iweek… http://www.flickr.com/photos/wizard…

Dear Meenakshi, The first link is a book which you could buy, if it is that important. The second and third links show pictures. The third link has a lot of good, big,photos of a wedding where everybody is wearing traditional dress. For lots of info on the country: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_La…

Hope this helps, Ashok

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 3 Council Members)

 
Response from: Life Beautiful,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Hi,

Following link may help you.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fashio… http://www.infolanka.com/photo/fest…

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 3 Council Members)

 
Response from: NEERAJA NAVEEN,   
Registered Member on Ask Agent
Traditional Clothing of Sri Lanka Originally, Sri Lankan people generally went topless, or only draped part of their clothing over their chests and shoulders when needed. Later, with the arrival of the Portuguese, widespread European type Christian ideology gave people the idea that the sight of women's breasts was sinful. So much of what is "traditionally" worn in Sri Lanka today has little to do with Sri Lankan tradition. Women's Clothes:

Hetta and Cheeththa

Hetta As best as I can understand from the few photos and little information there is on the internet, a hetta is a short sleeved shirt that is fitted and waist length. They may or may not have buttons down the front, but unlike the choli, they all have a closed back.

Cheeththa The cheeththa, as far as I can tell, is a long ankle length skirt. I do not yet know how it is made, whether as a skirt or as a wrap, or as a wrap tucked into a belt. Osari A type of sari.

Lamsari A lamsari appears to be a two piece dress with long ruffles at the shoulders and waist.

Sri Lankan women and girls also sometimes wear salwar and sari.

Men's Clothes:

Traditional clothing for Sri Lankan men is amude or sarong.

Sri Lankans take great pride in their appearance; it is rare to see a person not wearing clean and pressed clothes when away from home. Although the youth and people in cities wear Western-style clothing, traditional forms of dress remain popular. Women may wear a tight blouse and a saree, a wraparound dress that reaches to the ankles. The saree is made from a very long piece of fabric. It is draped over the shoulder and wrapped at the waist in a way that creates tailoring without being sewn. Women also wear a redda (a wraparound skirt that is tucked at the waist) with a hatte (blouse) that leaves the midriff bare.

Traditional attire for men may include loose-fitting trousers combined with a long shirt that reaches to mid-thigh. The shirt has long, loose sleeves and buttons to the neck. Men might also wear a sarong (a piece of cloth wrapped around the waist, sometimes held by a belt or lunghi) that reaches to the ankles. This is worn with a banian (a sleeveless shirt) and a handkerchief draped over the right shoulder. An urban man is unlikely to wear a sarong in public, but often changes into one after arriving home. In rural areas, the sarong is used for everyday public attire.

see the links :

http://livingheritage.org/toplessne…

http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/cultura…

http://www.lankalibrary.com/rit.htm…

Rate = 3 (Rated by 5 Council Members)

Thank this advisor   
 
Response from: S S,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Traditional Clothing of Sri Lanka Originally, Sri Lankan people generally went topless, or only draped part of their clothing over their chests and shoulders when needed. Later, with the arrival of the Portuguese, widespread European type Christian ideology gave people the idea that the sight of women's breasts was sinful. So much of what is "traditionally" worn in Sri Lanka today has little to do with Sri Lankan tradition. Women's Clothes:

Hetta and Cheeththa

Hetta As best as I can understand from the few photos and little information there is on the internet, a hetta is a short sleeved shirt that is fitted and waist length. They may or may not have buttons down the front, but unlike the choli, they all have a closed back. Cheeththa The cheeththa, as far as I can tell, is a long ankle length skirt. I do not yet know how it is made, whether as a skirt or as a wrap, or as a wrap tucked into a belt. Osari A type of sari.

Lamsari A lamsari appears to be a two piece dress with long ruffles at the shoulders and waist.

Sri Lankan women and girls also sometimes wear salwar and sari.

Men's Clothes:

Traditional clothing for Sri Lankan men is amude or sarong.

http://moderntraditional.com/magazi…

Rate = 2 (Rated by 5 Council Members)

 
Response from: C. Raj, United Kingdom,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Meenakshi,

Please visit these websites, they will give you the attires of Srilanka

www.proquestk12.com/downloads/SriLa…

encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761568352_3/Sri_Lanka.html

theculturedtraveler.com/Heritage/Archives/KANDY.htm

www.everyculture.com/multi/Sr-Z/Sri…

www.webquarry.com/~raditha/srilanka…

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 6 Council Members)

 
Response from: Mrs. Sai Sai,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
meenakshi jeganathan,

Please see this link to know about dress style in Sri Lanka

http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia…

Traditional clothing for both men and women includes long wrap-around cloths that form garments for the lower body.

Women’s garments are called sari and redda. Redda is often worn with a traditional jacket called hatte.

Men’s garments are called sarama or sarong. The sarama is worn with a collarless tunic-style shirt.

You can also see this link

http://www.proquestk12.com/download…

Traditional forms of dress remains popular in Sri Lanka. Women may wear a tight blouse and a saree, a wraparound dress that reaches to the ankles. The saree is made from a very long piece of fabric. It is draped over the shoulder and wrapped at the waist in a way that creates tailoring without being sewn. Women also wear a redda (a wraparound skirt that is tucked at the waist) with a hatte (blouse) that leaves the midriff bare.

Traditional attire for men may include loose-fitting trousers combined with a long shirt that reaches to mid-thigh. The shirt has long, loose sleeves and buttons to the neck. Men might also wear a sarong (a piece of cloth wrapped around the waist, sometimes held by a belt or lunghi) that reaches to the ankles. This is worn with a banian (a sleeveless shirt) and a handkerchief draped over the right shoulder.

An urban man is unlikely to wear a sarong in public, but often changes into one after arriving home. In rural areas, the sarong is used for everyday public attire.

You can also see this link

http://moderntraditional.com/magazi…

Rate = 3 (Rated by 5 Council Members)

Thank this advisor   
 
Response from: Latha Jayaprakash,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: http://moderntraditional.com/magazi…
Dear Meenakshi,

Women's Clothes:

Hetta and Cheeththa

Hetta As best as I can understand from the few photos and little information there is on the internet, a hetta is a short sleeved shirt that is fitted and waist length. They may or may not have buttons down the front, but unlike the choli, they all have a closed back. Cheeththa The cheeththa, as far as I can tell, is a long ankle length skirt. I do not yet know how it is made, whether as a skirt or as a wrap, or as a wrap tucked into a belt.

Osari A type of sari.

Lamsari A lamsari appears to be a two piece dress with long ruffles at the shoulders and waist.

Sri Lankan women and girls also sometimes wear salwar and sari.

Men's Clothes:

Traditional clothing for Sri Lankan men is amude or sarong.

http://moderntraditional.com/magazi…

and it is also mentioed in the site

http://www.proquestk12.com/download…

All the best

Rate = 3 (Rated by 3 Council Members)

 
Hi, Traditional Clothing of Sri Lanka Originally, Sri Lankan people generally went topless, or only draped part of their clothing over their chests and shoulders when needed. Later, with the arrival of the Portuguese, widespread European type Christian ideology gave people the idea that the sight of women's breasts was sinful. So much of what is "traditionally" worn in Sri Lanka today has little to do with Sri Lankan tradition. Women's Clothes:

Hetta and Cheeththa

Hetta As best as I can understand from the few photos and little information there is on the internet, a hetta is a short sleeved shirt that is fitted and waist length. They may or may not have buttons down the front, but unlike the choli, they all have a closed back. Cheeththa

The cheeththa, as far as I can tell, is a long ankle length skirt. I do not yet know how it is made, whether as a skirt or as a wrap, or as a wrap tucked into a belt.

Osari A type of sari.

Lamsari A lamsari appears to be a two piece dress with long ruffles at the shoulders and waist.

Sri Lankan women and girls also sometimes wear salwar and sari

Men's Clothes:

Traditional clothing for Sri Lankan men is amude or sarong.

http://moderntraditional.com/magazi…

TRADITIONAL COSTUMES

Sri Lankan men did not wear garments on their upper body prior to the sixteenth century. This distinction was reserved for royalty and warriors, who wore protective clothing or armor. The lower garment, the dhoti, was worn from the waist to below the knees. Ancient Sinhalese garments, especially those of the upper classes, were divided and neatly arranged in folds horizontally. During very cold weather, a mantle would be worn over the usual dress.

During ancient times, Sinhalese women did not cover the upper part of their bodies. Middle-class women wore only a cloth around their hips while at home, and used another piece of cloth to cover their shoulders when they went outdoors. Upper-class women were often bare-breasted, although heavily bejeweled, and their lower-class female attendants wore a breast-band.

With the arrival of the Portuguese in the early sixteenth century, Sinhalese dress underwent a dramatic change. Sri Lankan men quickly adopted the types of shirts, trousers, socks, and shoes worn by Portuguese settlers. Prior to this time, only upper class Sinhalese wore shoes. In the Kandyan kingdom, women wore a short frock with sleeves that covered the arms. The frock was made of fine white calico wrought with blue and red thread in flowers and branch designs. Both Kandyan men and women wore jewelry. The men wore gold chains, pendants, girdles, and finger rings. Women wore chains, pendants, girdles and rings in addition to earrings, (kundalabharana), anklets (pa-salamba), bracelets, and toe-rings (pa-mudu).

From the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries, respectable women covered their upper bodies while women of the low castes and the untouchables (Rodi) were prohibited from doing so. On their lower bodies, women wore a garment that was similar to a dhoti. For upper-class women, this garment extended to the ankles. Upper-class women also wore more elaborate lower garments in an array of colors. Women in the lower classes were usually naked from the waist up, and their lower garments did not extend below their knees. During the seventeenth century, upper-class men wore doublets of white or blue calico around the middle torso, a white one next to the skin, and a blue one over the white, with a blue or red sash at the waist. A knife with a carved handle inlaid with silver protruded from the garment folds at the chest.

http://www.everyculture.com/multi/S…

Rate = 3 (Rated by 2 Council Members)

Thank this advisor   
 
 
 
 
 
More People Advice


 




Privacy Policy
Terms & Conditions
Ask Agent™ Tech Support/Help
Contact Us
Advertising Program
About the Ask Agent™ technology
Affiliate Program
Celebrity Queries
Latest Updates


Get the latest queries and responses via  Add Ammas Gadget to your iGoogle
Important Disclaimer: This question and answer system is open to the public. The opinions expressed are those of their individual authors, as attributed beside each item of advice. Neither the authors nor the information they provide are endorsed by this website. We recommend using common sense, making your own inquiries, and, if necessary, seeking professional advice before relying on material generated on this site.

Copyright © 1998 - 2014 Ammas.com.
Powered by Ask Agent
Patents filed since 2001 -- Request Patent Numbers
TOP