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Query from: Jyotindra, USA, 12/19/07
Topic: DIET      Submitted on: Ammas.com
Subject: Low GI indian foods

I would like to now which indian foods are low in GI for diabetics

Rate = 3 (Rated by 7 Council Members)
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Response from: Indumukhi A.,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Following the GI may be smart for all Indians, not just diabetics, given risks for diabetes, PCOs, etc. So you have asked a very good question!

The site I use to calculate the GI of my favorite foods is:

http://www.glycemicindex.com/…

Here is a good chart for you:

http://www.indiacurry.com/obesity/g…

Here are some of the best foods you can eat (lowest GI):

Chana dal

Rajma

Peanuts

Milk

Black beans

Vermicelli

Garbanzo beans

Tomatoes

Barley

Curd

Spinach and leafy greens

Okra

Cabbage

Radish

Eggplant

Onions

Cauliflower

Basmati rice is around the same on the GI as brown rice!!! Try to cook with a little less water or make a little less soft for lower GI. You can do the same with pasta.

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 10 Council Members)

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Response from: Sushma Bayyana,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Hi Jyotindra,

Its suggested that the use of barley helps reduce the Glycemic Index (GI) of the foods it is incorporated into.

The presence of soluble fiber from Sustagrain barley is known to reduce the GI of the foods and hence presents a better diet option to maintain blood sugar levels.

The research states that incorporation of Sustagrain barley with atta flour at 15% and 20% levels makes the blend a low GI product. On a regular use, the blood sugars and glycoselated hemoglobin were significantly reduced.

And do visit http://www.gilisting.com… for a complete education on Glycemic Index and lists of foods with low GI and ranges of it.

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 14 Council Members)

 
Response from: ravi kumar,   
Registered Member on Ask Agent
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Hi, I would like to state first how the Glycemic Index of a food is determined. Test foods are fed to volunteers in portions that contain 50g of available carbs, excluding fiber. The glucose / insulin response over the next 2 - 3 hours is measured. The result is calculated as a % of the value for the reference food, usually white bread. Usually white bread is taken as reference and its GI value is taken to be 100. At some references glucose is also taken as reference. Low GI 55 or less Medium GI 56 - 69 High GI 70 or more Some of the Indian food with low GI values are Complex cereals like whole wheat, whole wheat noodles, bajra, jowar, ragi, wheat bran, rice bran, barley etc. Dals and pulses like chana dal,moong dal, tur dal, rajma, moong etc. All vegetables like cabbage, brinjal, cluster beans, spinach, methi etc. except potatoes, yam and sweet potatoes. Low fat dairy products like milk, curds, paneer and buttermilk. Fruits with low sugar and high water content like pineapple etc. Have only one serving of fruit at a time

Technically, chana dal has one of the lowest indices of any food on the glycemic index, 8 (where glucose = 100). Its index is 5 according to one study and 11 according to another.

Glycemic Index of some common Indian food items taking glucose (=100) as the reference are as below Milk, skimmed 32, low-fat 30, whole 27 and Yogurt whole milk 45 Apple 38,Banana 55, Grapes 46, Orange 44, Pear 38, Plum (Aloo Bukara) 39, Chana Dal 11, Urad (Black beans) 43, Black eyed beans 41, Garbanzo Beans Boiled 33, Mung beans (Green gram) 38, Horse gram 51, Red Kidney beans boiled 30, Pinto beans 39, Rajma 19, Soy Boiled 18 Rye 34, Brown Rice 55, Peanuts 14, Peas boiled 48, Boiled Carrots 49.

Many a times it is difficult to determine the GI of a food because of the presence of different items and different amount of fats and protien items used in preparing it.But the above list may be referred to know the GI of a food.

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Response from: Latha Jayaprakash,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Dear Jyotindra,

Foods that help diabetics bring down sugar levels

Diabetics should fill up on leafy vegetables, bitter gourd (karela), papaya, oranges, lentils and legumes with strings and skin intact, whole grain cereals, bran, pulses, sprouted mung, and 10 to 20 grams of guar gum (from cluster beans)

Prohibited Foods

Glucose, sugar , honey and all sweets, jaggery, ice-cream, pastries, cake, jam, jelly, squash, canned fruit juice, sugarcane juice, chocolates, bourn vita, all aerated waters except soda.

Foods to avoid

Potatoes, Yam (zimikand), Arbi, Mangoes, Grapes, Cheeku and Bananas, Dried food stuffs, Dried fruits and Nuts e.g. peanuts, almonds, cashew nuts, raising and coconut etc., all alcoholic drinks.

Foods to be used freely

Green leafy vegetables, tomatoes, cucumber, radish, lime, clear soups, black coffee without milk and sugar, butter milk (lassie), sour chatnis and pickles without oil, pepper and zeera water, jamun fruit and karela juice. General instruction for patients suffering from diabetes;

Keep strictly to your diet if any change is required then consult the dietician If you do not feel well or if you are in difficulty about your medicine, consult the doctor. If you are gaining or losing weight, inform your doctor Test your urine regularly and get your blood examined once a month Walk at least a mile daily. Keep your skin clean and feet dry. Avoid wearing tight shoes and socks. Consult your doctor on any skin problems. If you have any injury or you are going for an operation, declare to your doctor that you are a diabetic. If any other problem worrying you, see the social worker / counselor. Instructions to patients taking Insulin

Do not alter the dose of Insulin without consulting the doctor. Do not allow more than an hour to elapse between a injection of Insulin and your food. If you get a cold, sore throat or feverish illness, do not stop taking Insulin. Take plenty of milky food instead of solids, if it is difficult to swallow. All the best

Rate = 3 (Rated by 11 Council Members)

 
Response from: Geetha Gopakumar,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
These are foods with a low glycemic index and hence a large part of your diet should comprise of these foods. Foods with a low glycemic index increase the blood sugar gradually and so are good for diabetics. According to Indian situation and food habits - complex cereals like whole wheat, whole wheat noodles, bajra, jowar, ragi, wheat bran, rice bran, barley etc., Dals and pulses like moong dal, tur dal, rajma, moong etc., all vegetables like cabbage, brinjal, cluster beans, spinach, methi etc. except those mentioned in the restricted list like potatoes, yam and sweet potatoes, low fat dairy products like milk, curds, paneer and buttermilk, Fruits with low sugar and high water content like watermelon, pineapple etc. Have only one serving of fruit at a time - are low in GI suitable for diabetic persons.

Reduce sugar rich fruits like chickoo, custard apple, grapes and mango,Vegetables such as potatoes, yam, purple yam and sweet potato, Polished rice,Biscuits such as Digestive and Marie,Artificial sweeteners, Restrict the intake of fat to 3 teaspoons per day, Cheese etc.

The foods which are to be avoided as they can only cause harm to your health and have little or no nutritive values. These can escalate the blood sugar levels almost instantaneously -Refined sugar, honey, jaggery, jam and jellies - Deep fried foods like wafers, samosas, farsan etc -High fat salad dressings which use cream, mayonnaise etc - Fruit juices as they rapidly increase the blood sugar levels. Instead, it is better to have a whole fruit as it contains fibre which is beneficial to regulate your blood sugar levels - Aerated drinks, preserved or canned fruit and fruit squash which contain loads of sugar as preservative, Alcohol, Nuts like dried cashewnuts, almonds etc., as they are high in saturated fat, Sweet meats like peda, barfi and all other mithais, Chocolates, puddings and pies, full fat ice-creams, biscuits made with refined flour, high sugar and cream content.

Rate = 3 (Rated by 11 Council Members)

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Response from: Arathi Jagirdar,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
You can make variety of soups using vegetables like spinach, Tomato, cauliflower, Beans.

U can also include in your diet cucumber, brinjal, carrot and capsium.

Kidney beans(Rajma), Green gram, channa dal, Dries peas and low in GI level

Fruits may include apple, banana small variety, orange, grapes but in small quantities espically for diabetic patients.

U can use parboiled rice, oatmeal and barley. (Barley flour - Roti)

Low fat or skimmed milk is essential.

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 14 Council Members)

 
Response from: M Manju,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Hello Jyotindra, You havent stated that u r vegeterian or not..

Anyway some items Artichoke <15 Asparagus <15 Avocado < 15 Broccoli <15 Cauliflower <15 Celery <15 Cucumber <15 Eggplant <15 Green beans <15 Lettuce, all varieties <15 Low-fat yogurt, artificially sweetened <15 Peanuts <15 Peppers, all varieties <15 Snow peas <15 Spinach <15 Young summer squash <15 Zucchini <15 Tomatoes 15

some recipes sites: http://www.the-gi-diet.org/recipes/… http://www.indianharvest.com/html/h…

for further reference: http://www.lowglycemicdiet.com/gifo… http://www.nutricoach.net/low_gi_fo…

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 14 Council Members)

 
Response from: kjk jlkj,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: google
Hai JYotindra To some people, the thought of eating out and of maintaining a low-GI diet might seem like a contradiction in terms. It's not! Although you might not have as much control over what you eat when you're out of the house, restaurants today offer a growing variety of healthy and delicious low-GI foods. Many menus, for example, feature grilled seafood, fresh vegetables, pastas, and fruits; choices such as these are healthy also, because they're low in fat. And with the growing popularity of ethnic foods, healthy choices are even broader. Indian food. Indian cuisine is generally friendly to a low-GI diet. It features legumes, chicken, fish, vegetables, and yogurt. Just be aware of the high-fat fried foods and heavy, butter-based sauces. For indian foods recipes see this site. www.nutricoach.net/low_gi_foods.htm…

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Response from: NEERAJA NAVEEN,   
Registered Member on Ask Agent
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Indian cuisine is generally friendly to a low-GI diet. It features legumes, chicken, fish, vegetables, and yogurt. Just be aware of the high-fat fried foods and heavy, butter-based sauces. Hamburgers and other fast-food sandwiches are served on processed breads and rolls having high GIs. Most fast foods are also very high in fat and sodium. As a general rule, try to avoid fast foods.

Asian-style sticky white rice, though, which has a high GI. A low-GI alternative would be oriental noodles (egg, rice, or mung bean). Try to stay away from deep-fried foods, also-not so much from a GI standpoint, but because they're very high in fat.water seems to often over looked. It is absolutely essential for maintaining good glucose control. Chronic dehydration is a common condition in both diabetics and the general population. It is needed to flush excess glucose from the body and also is needed in eliminating toxins.

Fiber is needed to maintain healthy elimination and a healthy digestive tract. It also slows the conversion of carbohydrates to glucose and helps lower cholesterol. Recommendation is for 30 grams of fiber per day.

The GI describes the type of carbohydrate in foods and its potential to raise blood glucose levels. Our actual blood glucose levels are determined by both the quality, or GI, of the carbohydrate and the quantity of carbohydrate. We can predict the effect of a food on our blood glucose level by calculating the glycemic load which is the GI x the amount of carbohydrate, divided by 100. Teaspoon of jam (GI = 51): (51 x 5 grams carb) / 100 = 2.5

The GI database confirms the reproducibility of GI results around the world. White and wholemeal bread, apples, cornflakes, breakfast cereals etc give the same results wherever/whoever tests them. Where there is variability, there are four possible explanations:

1) Some GI testing groups are not as experienced/accurate as ours. They use venous blood which gives more variability than capillary blood. If we test a product over and over again, we get the same result ± 5%. That's as good as nutrient data such as protein, fat, fibre etc.

2) The variability among different types of potatoes, rices, and oats is REAL. They contain different types of starch (amylose, amylopectin) and that affects the degree of starch gelatinisation. When it comes to sugars like fructose, the concentration of the solution makes a difference to the rate of gastric emptying and therefore the glycemic response. A more dilute solution, say 25 g fructose in 500 mL water will have a higher GI than 25 g fructose in 250 mL. But fructose has a very low GI whichever way you consume it.

3) Sometimes the manufacturer may change the formulation of their product by reducing the fat content for example. Reducing the fat can increase the GI. Manufacturers may have their products retested if they make significant changes to the formulation, or source ingredients from different suppliers.

4) Some foods have been tested in people with type 2 diabetes. These values may be higher than that seen in the normal population.

Pasta has a low GI because of the physical entrapment of ungelatinised starch granules in a sponge-like network of protein (gluten) molecules in the pasta dough. Pasta is unique in this regard. As a result, pastas of any shape and size have a fairly low GI (30 to 60). Asian noodles such as hokkein, udon and rice vermicelli also have low to intermediate GI values.

Some vegetables appear to have a high GI,Does this mean a person with diabetes should avoid eating them means , Definitely not, because, unlike potatoes and cereal products, these vegetables are very low in carbohydrate. So, despite their high GI, their glycemic load (GI x carb per serve divided by 100) is low. Vegetables contain only small amounts of carbohydrate but loads of micronutrients and should be considered as "free foods". Eat them all you like!

Some high fat foods have a low GI. Doesn't this give a falsely favourable impression of that food means ,Yes it does, especially if the fat is saturated fat. The GI value of potato chips or french fries is lowerthan baked potatoes. Large amounts of fat in foods tends to slow the rate of stomach emptying and therefore the rate at which foods are digested. Yet the saturated fat in these foods will contribute to a much increased risk of heart disease. It is important to look at the type of fat in foods rather than avoid it completely. Good fats are found in foods such as avocadoes, nuts and legumes while saturated fats are found in dairy products, cakes and biscuits. We'd all be better off if we left the cakes and biscuits for special occasions.

Potatoes and bread, despite their high GI, can play a major role in a high carb/low fat diet, even if your goal is to reduce the overall GI. Only about half the carbohydrate needs to be exchanged from high to low GI to derive health benefits. Of course, some types of bread and potatoes have a lower GI and these should be preferred in order to lower the GI as much as possible. Why doesn't the GI of beef, chicken, fish, tofu, eggs, nuts, seeds, avocadoes, many fruits and vegetables, wine, beer and spirits appear in GI lists mean, These foods contain no carbohydrate, or so little that their GI can't be tested according to the standard methodology. Bear in mind that the GI is a measure of carbohydrate quality, not quantity. Essentially, these types of foods, eaten alone, won't have much effect on your blood glucose levels.

Why not just adopt a low carbohydrate diet (like the Atkins diet) to keep my blood glucose levels and weight down,means, Recent studies show that low carb diets such as the Atkins diet produce faster rates of weight loss than conventional low fat diets. The probable mechanism is lower day-long insulin levels - allowing greater use of fat as the source of fuel - the same mechanism underlying the success of low GI diets. We believe that low carb diets are unnecessarily restrictive (bread, potato, rice, grains and most fruits are restricted) and may spell trouble in the long term if saturated fat takes the place of carbohydrate. Low GI diets strike a happy medium between low fat and low carb diets - you can have your carbs, but must choose them carefully.

Indian dahls, stir-fries with rice, sushi, noodles - you're in luck, because they are all low GI. Choose vermicelli noodles prepared from rice or mung beans and low GI rices such as basmati. Use sweet potato instead of potato, use all manner of vegetables without any regard for their GI. Choose fruits and dairy for their low GI. If you can tolerate dairy products, then take advantage of them for their universal low GI. If lactose intolerance is a problem, reach for live cultured yoghurts and lactose-hydrolysed milks.Even ice-cream can be enjoyed if you ingest a few drops oflactase enzyme first. use of barley, helps to reduce gi. see http://lowgidietrecipes.com…

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Response from: Swathika S,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Healthy and low GI indian foods: Rice Basmati, long grain brown rice

Noodles Dried thin egg noodles

Beans (Canned or Dry) Garbanzo beans, kidney, lima, pinto, soybeans

Lentils Any type

Dried Fruits Apricots, berries, figs, prunes

Frozen Fruits Any type, but berries are particularly good

Nuts Peanuts, walnuts, Brazils

Canned Fish (in Water) Tuna, sardines, mackerel, salmon

Canned Vegetables (for Quick Use) Asparagus, beans, carrots, mushrooms, peas

Frozen Vegetables Beans, broccoli, cauliflower, corn, peas, spinach

Oils Olive oil, canola, flaxseed, wheatgerm

Condiments Lemon juice, soy, chili sauce

Dairy Fat-free milk, Reduced-fat fruit yogurt, Reduced-fat cheese, Reduced-fat ice cream

Eggs Organic are best

Fresh Fruits Any type, choose a variety

Fresh Vegetables Any type, choose a variety

Beverages Bottled water, fruit juices

Try to take these following foods freely: Green leafy vegetables, tomatoes, cucumber. radish, soups, buttermilk, tea and coffee without sugar.

The following foods should be restricted: Potatoes, yam, arbi, sweet potatoes, mangoes, grapes, bananas, alcoholic beverages, fried foods, paranthas, poories, pakoras, mathris, deep fried foods, dry fruits, salad oils, cakes and pastries.

The following foods should be avoided: Glucose, sugar, honey, all sweets, chocolates and candies

Dont skip meals Be regular with exercises. Walking will be good. Draw a big 8 on the floor and walk on that. This type of walking regulates the glucose level.

Try to take these often: Channa dal, soyabean, guava, papaya, oats, brown rice, lentils, spinach and foods rich in fibre.

All the best.......

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Response from: Ms saipriya r,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
hello jyotindar here are few thing i know abt what foods u can eat 1. Carbohydrates Carbohydrates should fulfil approximately 60 to 65% of your daily energy intake (calories). A common misconception is that most carbohydrates are regarded as sugars, as a result of which they are completely avoided in the diabetic diet whereas actually one should choose carbohydrates carefully. Carbohydrates are divided into two groups, viz. simple carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates like sugar, honey, jaggery etc do not need to be metabolized and hence will raise the blood sugar levels immediately. These should be avoided. Refined cereals like maida, pasta, semolina etc. should also be avoided as the process of refining breaks down these complex carbohydrates into simple carbohydrates that raise the blood sugar levels rapidly.

On the other hand, consumption of complex carbohydrates such as whole wheat, jowar, bajra, oats, brown rice instead of white rice etc. should be given more emphasis. These complex carbohydrates are preferred as they take longer to digest and thus give rise to a gradual increase blood sugar levels is gradual, making it easier for a diabetic person to adjust to the changes in blood sugar levels.

The important thing for diabetics is not to completely restrict their consumption of carbohydrates, but need to alter the type of carbohydrates consumed. For example, it is better to have unpolished or brown rice instead of polished white rice. A simple way to find out how quickly foods raise your blood sugar levels is by means of the glycemic index. Foods with a high glycemic index are those that raise the blood sugar levels very rapidly. It is a misconception that only table sugar shoots up the blood sugar levels. The glycemic index shows that certain foods like potato, yam etc. also show a rapid increase in blood sugar levels and are hence termed as high glycemic index foods.

It is advisable for diabetics to consume foods with a low glycemic index (as they bring about a gradual rise in the blood sugar levels) such as guava, plums, cluster beans, broccoli, cauliflower etc. and to mix foods with medium glycemic index such as pineapple, muskmelon, pastas etc. with low glycemic index foods.

2. Protein This nutrient is required for the regular maintenance of our body and wear and tear of our tissues. Protein should form approximately 12 to 20% of our daily caloric (energy) intake.

It is essential to include protein in our diet, but only just enough to meet our daily requirements as excess protein puts a lot of burden on our kidneys to excrete its by-products.

We need not drastically reduce the protein in our diet, but should consume it in moderation. Try and include only one source of protein in each meal. For example, either eggs or milk for breakfast, either curds or dal for lunch or dinner etc. Avoid having dal, paneer and curds in the same meal, as that becomes a very heavy dose of protein. 3. Fat Fat is a concentrated source of energy and it makes us feel satiated. It is also necessary for our body in small quantities as apart from calories (1 gm. of oil or fat = 9 calories), it contains essential fatty acids, which are required to perform certain vital functions in our body. Since These fatty acids cannot be produced naturally by our body, if we do not consume the recommended amount of fat per day, our body becomes deficient in these fatty acids causing visible symptoms like fatigue, weakness, mood swings, dry skin and dry hair.

Oil also helps in the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins like A, D, E and K. Vitamin A and E are important in our daily diet, as they are antioxidants which means they help us to build up our immune system to fight against the odds of infection. Vitamin D helps in strengthening our bones and teeth, whereas vitamin K helps in clotting our blood during injuries.

Care should be taken in choosing the right type of fat, to prevent another common consequence of diabetes viz.. heart disease. Oil, butter, vanaspati or ghee - which of these is better? We often wonder.... Well, here are the answers to that.

Oil is a healthier cooking option, although you can include small amounts of ghee and butter, using it sparingly. It is advisable for healthy individuals to consume no more than 6 teaspoons of fat (30 grams) per day and for diabetics not more than 3 teaspoons of fat per day , to avoid any health complications. Another way of keeping count is to measure out ½ litre (approx. ½ kg) per person per month. This recommendation is for diabetics with normal blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels. In case the levels are higher, check with your physician as to whether to cut down on fat or change the type of fat you are using. Excessive fat on the other hand, apart from making us put on weight can also disturb the absorption of important nutrients like calcium in our body.

4. Fibre Fibre is a complex carbohydrate present in foods and although it is not really a 'nutrient', it is nevertheless an important component of our diet. It cleans up our system, prevents constipation and reduces blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels thus helping to prevent heart disease. Our diet should include approximately 15 to 25 grams of fibre daily.

Fibre is extremely essential for diabetics, as it satiates us for longer periods and due to its low glycemic index causes slow release of sugar in the blood stream, thus helping to control diabetes. This also improves the efficiency of insulin in the cells and hence may decrease the need for external insulin if the person is insulin dependent.

Fibre is found only in foods derived from plants and how much depends on whether it has been processed. For example, unpolished rice contains much more fibre than processed/polished rice.

Here are some easy ways to include fibre in your diet.

Start the day with a high fibre dish like Muesli, Green Pea Pancakes etc. Have plenty of vegetables, especially raw vegetables in the form of salads and raitas. Do not peel vegetables and fruits like cucumber, carrot and apples as their peels are edible. Do remember to wash them thoroughly, or scrape the peels slightly before eating.

Eat high fibre foods like dried peas, beans and lentils.

Choose brown bread or rotis made with whole wheat flour instead of instead of white bread or pasta made from refined flour.

Try to use the bran of cereals like wheat, oats and rice in your regular meals. For example, adding 1 tablespoon of bran in the chapati dough or in the vegetable dishes will provide plenty of fibre. Bran is also a good thickening agent that can add low calorie bulk to soups, gravies etc. Bran is easily available at most health food stores and larger grocery stores.

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Response from: Mrs. Sai Sai,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Jyotindra,

Please see this link to know about Foods Allowed Restricted And Forbidden for Diabetic patients

http://www.tarladalal.com/DiabFoods…

All these foods should be eaten according the serving sizes that are mentioned on the Food Exchange List (http://www.tarladalal.com/diabfoode…)

Foods Allowed

These are foods with a low glycemic index and hence a large part of your diet should comprise of these foods. Foods with a low glycemic index increase the blood sugar gradually and so are good for diabetics.

Complex cereals like whole wheat, whole wheat noodles, bajra, jowar, ragi, wheat bran, rice bran, barley etc.

Dals and pulses like moong dal, tur dal, rajma, moong etc.

All vegetables like cabbage, brinjal, cluster beans, spinach, methi etc. except those mentioned in the restricted list like potatoes, yam and sweet potatoes.

Low fat dairy products like milk, curds, paneer and buttermilk.

Fruits with low sugar and high water content like watermelon, pineapple etc. Have only one serving of fruit at a time.

Restricted Foods

These are foods with a high glycemic index and they can escalate blood sugar levels faster than foods with a low glycemic index. Indulge in these foods in moderation and only as an occasional treat

Polished rice.

Sugar rich fruits like chickoo, custard apple, grapes and mango.

Vegetables such as potatoes, yam, purple yam and sweet potato.

Biscuits such as Digestive and Marie.

Cheese

Artificial sweeteners.

Restrict the intake of fat to 3 teaspoons per day.

Forbidden Foods

These foods are best avoided as they can only cause harm to your health and have little or no nutritive values. These can escalate the blood sugar levels almost instantaneously.

Sweet meats like peda, barfi and all other mithais.

Chocolates, puddings and pies, full fat ice-creams, biscuits made with refined flour, high sugar and cream content.

Refined sugar, honey, jaggery, jam and jellies.

Fruit juices as they rapidly increase the blood sugar levels. Instead, it is better to have a whole fruit as it contains fibre which is beneficial to regulate your blood sugar levels.

Nuts like dried cashewnuts, almonds etc., as they are high in saturated fat.

Aerated drinks, preserved or canned fruit and fruit squash which contain loads of sugar as preservative.

Deep fried foods like wafers, samosas, farsan etc.

High fat salad dressings which use cream, mayonnaise etc.

You can also see these links

http://www.meevy.com/2005/11/25/rag…

http://www.meevy.com/2006/12/07/dia…

http://www.meevy.com/2006/10/19/dia…

http://www.anothersubcontinent.com/…

http://www.tarladalal.com/Diabdiet.…

http://www.tarladalal.com/DiabNutri…

http://www.fatfreekitchen.com/diabe…

http://www.fatfreekitchen.com/diabe…

http://www.fatfreekitchen.com/diabe…

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