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Home > Categories > Food and Beverages > Cooking > View Advice  

Query from: Priya, Your location, 12/22/04
Topic: COOKING      Submitted on: Ammas.com
What is the difference between cooking soda (samayal soda, Appa soda) and baking powder? what does they do to the recipes?

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 14 Council Members)
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Response from: anushka ,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Baking powder consists of baking soda, one or more acid salts (cream of tartar and sodium aluminum sulfate) plus cornstarch to absorb any moisture so a reaction does not take place until a liquid is added to the batter. Baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate or bicarbonate of soda (alkali) is about four times as strong as baking powder. It is used in recipes that contain an acidic ingredient (e.g. vinegar, citrus juice, sour cream, yogurt, buttermilk, chocolate, cocoa (not Dutch-processed), honey, molasses (also brown sugar), fruits and maple syrup). When a recipe contains baking powder and baking soda, the baking powder does most of the leavening. The baking soda is added to neutralize the acids in the recipe plus to add tenderness and some leavening. Ref: http://www.joyofbaking.com/bakingso…

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 11 Council Members)

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Response from: Usha Gurnani,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Both baking soda and baking powder are leavening agents, which means they are added to baked goods before cooking to produce carbon dioxide and cause them to 'rise'. Baking powder contains baking soda, but the two substances are used under different conditions. Baking Soda

Baking soda is pure sodium bicarbonate. When baking soda is combined with moisture and an acidic ingredient (e.g., yogurt, chocolate, buttermilk, honey), the resulting chemical reaction produces bubbles of carbon dioxide that expand under oven temperatures, causing baked goods to rise. The reaction begins immediately upon mixing the ingredients, so you need to bake recipes which call for baking soda immediately, or else they will fall flat!

Baking Powder

Baking powder contains sodium bicarbonate, but it includes the acidifying agent already (cream of tartar), and also a drying agent (usually starch). Baking powder is available as single-acting baking powder and as double-acting baking powder. Single-acting powders are activated by moisture, so you must bake recipes which include this product immediately after mixing. Double-acting powders react in two phases and can stand for a while before baking. With double-acting powder, some gas is released at room temperature when the powder is added to dough, but the majority of the gas is released after the temperature of the dough increases in the oven.

How Are Recipes Determined?

Some recipes call for baking soda, while others call for baking powder. Which ingredient is used depends on the other ingredients in the recipe. The ultimate goal is to produce a tasty product with a pleasing texture. Baking soda is basic and will yield a bitter taste unless countered by the acidity of another ingredient, such as buttermilk. You'll find baking soda in cookie recipes. Baking powder contains both an acid and a base and has an overall neutral effect in terms of taste. Recipes that call for baking powder often call for other neutral-tasting ingredients, such as milk. Baking powder is a common ingredient in cakes and biscuits.

Substituting in Recipes

You can substitute baking powder in place of baking soda (you'll need more baking powder and it may affect the taste), but you can't use baking soda when a recipe calls for baking powder. Baking soda by itself lacks the acidity to make a cake rise. However, you can make your own baking powder if you have baking soda and cream of tartar. Simply mix two parts cream of tartar with one part baking soda.

http://chemistry.about.com/cs/foodc…

Rate = 3 (Rated by 10 Council Members)

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Response from: Shikha ,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Got this information from http://thefoodfanatic.blogs.com…

Baking powder is more of a concoction, with 1/3 of the composition being baking soda. The remaining 2/3 is usually cornstarch, or a mixture of cornstarch and "cream of tartar."

Baking SODA is "bicarbonate of soda", which reacts with liquid acids (buttermilk, yogurt, molasses) creating the bubbles, air pockets and sponginess you find in cakes and cookies.

Both of these are considered "leaveners" because they make foods lift, or rise. You can also throw yeast into this category, which creates a similar result but with a totally different approach.

The difference is that baking soda is just one ingredient, but baking powder is a combination of several ingredients, one being baking soda.

Rate = 2.5 (Rated by 12 Council Members)

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