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Query from: Anonymous, United States, 08/13/10
Topic: ANIMALS AND PETS      Submitted on: AnswerPod.com
Subject: Difference difference between a venomous snake and a non venomous snake

Here is the question: How can you tell the difference between a venomous snake and a non venomous snake?

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1):There are four different types of venomous snakes in the United States , cottonmouths, rattlesnakes, copperheads and coral snakes.

1. "Cottonmouths" have elliptical pupils and range in color from black to green. They have a white stripe along the side of their heads. They are often found in or around water, but have also adapted to live well on land. Young snakes have a bright yellow tail. They are often loners, so if you see multiple snakes coexisting peacefully, it is probably not a cottonmouth. 2. "Rattlesnakes" Look for the rattle on the tail. Some harmless snakes imitate the rattle by brushing their tails through leaves, but only rattle snakes have the button-like rattle at the end of the tail. If you can't see the rattle, they also have a heavy triangular head and elliptical eyes like a cat's. 3. "Copperheads" have a similar body shape to cottonmouths but are much brighter, ranging from coppery brown to bright orange, silver-pink and peach. The young have yellow tails as well. 4. "Coral snakes" have several lookalikes, including king snakes. They have distinctive coloring, though, with a black, yellow and red bands, a yellow head, and a black band over their nose. One rhyme to help distinguish coral snakes from king snakes is 'Red touch yellow, kill a fellow. Red touch black, friend to Jack.' However, most of the time coral snakes will not bite - they are very shy. There are no known deaths from the Arizona coral snake and only a few from the Eastern Coral snake

2):Nonvenomous snakes usually have a round pupil in the eye. Venomous snakes in the U.S. (except for the coral snake) have an elliptical pupil like a cat's eye. It looks like a small vertical slit in the middle of the eye. This can be difficult to determine without getting dangerously close, however.

3):Venomous Snakes in the U.S. tend to have varying colors. Most snakes that are one solid color are completely harmless. However, some cottonmouths are also venomous so this is not a foolproof way to tell them apart. Also, beware of venomous escaped pets.

4):Nonvenomous snakes have a spoon-shaped rounded head and venomous snakes will have a more triangular head. this is because of the venom glands (this is less noticeable on the coral snake).

5):If the snake has a rattle on its tail it is a rattlesnake, and therefore venomous. However, some nonvenomous snakes do mimic the rattler by rattling their tails, but lack the rattle "buttons" that sound like little salt shakers.

6):Some venomous snakes in the U.S. will have a small depression between the eye and the nostril. This is called a pit (hence "pit viper"), which is used by the snake to sense heat in their prey. Coral snakes are not pit vipers, and lack this feature.

7):Some nonvenomous snakes mimic the patterns and behaviors of venomous snakes. Eastern milk snakes can look like copperheads, rat snakes can look like rattlers, and harmless king snakes can look like coral snakes. Always treat any snake as a venomous snake if you are uncertain whether it is venomous or nonvenomous. And though you should remain cautious, do not kill any snake -- it could be illegal to do so, and killing nonvenomous snakes allows venomous snake and/or vermin populations to grow.

8):To tell the difference between a venomous water moccasin/cottonmouth and a harmless water snake: Check to see if it is swimming with only its head above water, or whether most of its body is floating, too. If just the head is showing, it is most likely a harmless water snake, but if the body is floating too, it could be a water moccasin (almost all venomous snakes swim with their lungs inflated, leaving the majority of their bodies afloat). A water moccasin will have elliptical pupils and the harmless water snake will have round pupils. Either way, leave it alone and allow it to leave the area.

9):If the end portion underneath the snake is going straight across, then it is venomous. If it starts to interlock, looking diamond shaped, then it is safe.

To find the difference between a venomous water moccasin/cottonmouth and a harmless water snake: Is it swimming with mainly its head above water, or is most of the body floating too? If just the head is showing, it is probably a harmless water snake, but if the body is showing too, it could be a water moccasin.

One can use head shapes to determine venomous snakes. Triangle shaped heads usually point to a venomous snake, while a ‘U’ shaped head points to a non-venomous snake.

Its not true, there is no short cut to know about which one is venomous, other than learning by practice – seeing them time and again, all snakes of one particular species look alike. So, all cobras will look alike, when confronted by a human being’s sudden appearance, they raise their hood, all Russell’s Vipers have the same kind of markings and hiss loud, all common kraits are black with twin bands on their body, all rat-snakes are alike, etc. So, you can learn about how to identify a snake, under trained eyes of an expert who is good at handling snakes or anyone who knows about snakes well.

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Response from: preeti saxena,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: http://www.snaketrapsnaketrapping.c…
Identification of Poisonous Snakes

Because all poisonous snakes are members of the pit viper family, you can easily tell the difference between poisonous and harmless snakes. The three ways to distinguish poisonous snakes: Pupil shape. The black part in the center of the eye (pupil) of harmless snakes is round. Poisonous snakes have egg-shaped or cat-like (elliptical) pupils (Figure 2a). In good light, you can easily see the pupil shape from a safe distance because snakes cannot jump nor can they strike from more than one-third of their body length.

Pit. Poisonous snakes also have a very conspicuous sensory area or pit (hence the name “pit viper”) on each side of the head. The pit looks somewhat like a nostril and helps the snake locate warm-bodied food. It is located about midway and slightly below the eye and nostril (Figure 2a). Harmless snakes do not have pits. Scale arrangement. The underside scales of a venomous snake's tail go all the way across in a single row from the anal plate (Figure 2b). The very tip of the tail may have two scale rows. Nonpoisonous snakes have two rows of scales from the vent to the end of the tail. This characteristic can also be observed on skins that have been shed. Other features that may help you identify a poisonous snake at a distance: Head shape. Venomous snakes usually have a triangular (wide at the back and attached to a narrow neck) or “spade-shaped” head. Be aware that many harmless snakes flatten their heads when threatened and may appear poisonous. Distinctive sound. Rattlesnakes will usually sound a warning rattle (a buzz or a dry, whirring sound) when approached. However, many nonpoisonous snakes (black racers, corn snakes, rat snakes, milk snakes, and pine snakes) and several poisonous snakes (copperhead and cottonmouth) often vibrate their tails when threatened. The sound produced by this vibration often imitates a rattle or hissing sound when the snake is sitting in dry grass or leaves. Tail. You can easily recognize young cottonmouths and copperheads by their bright yellow or greenish yellow tail.

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Response from: Sulagna guha,   
Featured Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Nonvenomous snakes usually have a round pupil in the eye. Venomous snakes in the U.S. (except for the coral snake) have an elliptical pupil like a cat's eye. It looks like a small vertical slit in the middle of the eye. This can be difficult to determine without getting dangerously close, however.Venomous Snakes in the U.S. tend to have varying colors. Most snakes that are one solid color are completely harmless. However, some cottonmouths are also venomous so this is not a foolproof way to tell them apart. Also, beware of venomous escaped pets. 4Nonvenomous snakes have a spoon-shaped rounded head and venomous snakes will have a more triangular head. this is because of the venom glands (this is less noticeable on the coral snake). 5If the snake has a rattle on its tail it is a rattlesnake, and therefore venomous. However, some nonvenomous snakes do mimic the rattler by rattling their tails, but lack the rattle "buttons" that sound like little salt shakers. 6Some venomous snakes in the U.S. will have a small depression between the eye and the nostril. This is called a pit (hence "pit viper"), which is used by the snake to sense heat in their prey. Coral snakes are not pit vipers, and lack this feature. 7Some nonvenomous snakes mimic the patterns and behaviors of venomous snakes. Eastern milk snakes can look like copperheads, rat snakes can look like rattlers, and harmless king snakes can look like coral snakes. Always treat any snake as a venomous snake if you are uncertain whether it is venomous or nonvenomous. And though you should remain cautious, do not kill any snake -- it could be illegal to do so, and killing nonvenomous snakes allows venomous snake and/or vermin populations to grow.f the end portion underneath the snake is going straight across, then it is venomous. If it starts to interlock, looking diamond shaped, then it is safe.

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Response from: kkjhgffgfg bjjkklllll;,   
Registered Member on Ask Agent
Source: http://www.snakecell.org/blog/how-t…
Common Krait Bungarus caeruleus Often, during my lectures on `snakes and snakebite’, or on the street or by guests at home, I am confronted by this commonly asked question `how to identify a snake’ or `how to differentiate between a venomous or non-venomous snake’. I think most of them expect me to give them a `quick fix’ answer – snakes those are black or hissing are venomous etc. Its not true, there is no short cut to know about which one is venomous, other than learning by practice – seeing them time and again, all snakes of one particular species look alike. So, all cobras will look alike, when confronted by a human being’s sudden appearance, they raise their hood, all Russell’s Vipers have the same kind of markings and hiss loud, all common kraits are black with twin bands on their body, all rat-snakes are alike, etc. So, you can learn about how to identify a snake, under trained eyes of an expert who is good at handling snakes or anyone who knows about snakes well. CAUTION: As a common man, you must not even try to identify a snake, it solves no purpose. Just follow one rule of thumb: maintain a safe distance from a snake and stay away from its striking range, which is approximately one third of the total body length of the snake in your proximity. For a common man, snake is a snake! In the past, I have seen, with poor knowledge of snakes, many snake handlers have got into trouble – mistaken identity ! Often a Russell’s Viper is mistaken for python baby, saw-scaled viper as common cat snake, common krait as wolf snake, etc. This can be a seriously dangerous and fatal mistake. Such incidents have occurred but not recorded so far. Whenever there is a Russell’s Viper sighted in my town, people often call and say that they have spotted a python baby. And I know that its Russell’s Viper and caution them to stay away at a safe distance and keep an eye till I reach. On the lighter side: the Indian politicians, who have red or blue beacons and flags on their cars as VIPs, are the most dangerous `animals’ and can be identified with those signs, they are the `venomous snakes’ (synonym to evil) in real terms, attack others unprovoked. Sadly, these two-legged animals are out of synch on this planet. No other animal lives outside the rules of our eco-system, to cause anykind of destruction. There is no other animal which is so arrogant, as humans. And not surprised, now humans have started paying the price, most of us are affected by disease. And may be on the brink of self-annihilation.

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Response from: Mridul Bora,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
A venomous snake will have certain features: 1. The head would be little bigger and it would expand when the snake is angry. But, the head of a non-venomous snake is always smaller than its body. 2. Venomous snakes are normally long and slender whereas, non-venomous snakes are thick. 3. Venomous snakes moves sharply and non-venomous are generally abit lazy type. 4. When bitten, venomous snakes will leave fang marks whereas, there is no fang marks in non-venomous snakes. 5. Venomous snakes generally leaves away from human habitant whereas, there is no such rules for non-venomous snakes. 6. Venomous snakes bites just ones and empty their venom to the victim whereas a non-venomous snake will generally repeatedly bite a person, or hold the portion till they are killed or removed.

Majority of the snakes are non-venomous. Yet people die of their bites just because of the shock or fear of poisoning. If we get to the history of snake bite deaths, we will find majority of the victims died from a heart attack, not from poisoning.

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Response from: Vijay Talasila,   
Registered Member on APOnline
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
There are three ways to determine the difference between venomous and non-venomous snakes. As a general rule, venomous snakes have elliptical pupils and a single row of scales on the underside of their tail. Pit vipers (which are all venomous) have a pit midway between their nostrils and their eyes. Non-venomous snakes have round pupils and two rows of scales on the under side of their tail.

If you are bitten by a venomous snake the wound will almost instantly show signs of swelling and discoloration of the surrounding tissue. A tingling sensation and nausea usually will accompany these symptoms. Bites from pit vipers (rattlesnakes) will show two prominent fang marks as well as other teeth marks.

Non-venomous snakes cause no direct damage to humans, structures, or pets. These snakes assist in controlling local insect and rodent populations. Some non-venomous snakes eat other snakes, even venomous ones. Occasionally snakes will enter buildings and other structures for shelter or food, which can cause the occupants to become uneasy.

Non-venomous snake bites are harmless. The only concern would be potential infection. If bitten, clean and sterilize the wound with disinfectant. Treat and cover the wound similar to any cut or abrasion you may have received previously.

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Response from: nissar ahmed,   
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/i…
Knowing where you live would really help me answer this question. The other answers Ive seen here are all guesses and generalizations. There are non-venomous snakes with slit pupils and there are venomous snakes with round pupils. There are non venomous snakes with triangular shaped heads and there are venomous snakes with straight heads. Many non venomous snakes vibrate their tails and in the right conditions it sounds very much like a rattle. Some rattlesnakes rattles are so small, that you can barely hear them and they dont sound very rattle-like. There are plenty of venomous snakes with no rattle. Also rattles can come off the snake and with only one button, a rattlesnake is unable to rattle.

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Response from: vrindha nair,   
Featured Member on Ammas.com
Source: INTERNET
Hello, Poisonous are dangerous ad non-poisonous are not dangerous. Please see this site for details: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publ… http://extension.usu.edu/files/publ…

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