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Query from: srividya, coimbatore,india, 08/04/08
Topic: POOJA      Submitted on: Ammas.com
Subject: Nag Panchami Festival

More specifically about fasting on that day..

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Response from: NEERAJA NAVEEN,   
Registered Member on Ask Agent
Source: http://www.hindu-blog.com/2008/07/n…
Nag-Panchami is an important all-India festival and is celebrated on the fifth day of the moonlit-fortnight in the month of Shravan (July /August). This is the time when serpents invariably come out of their holes that get inundated with rain-water to seek shelter in gardens and many times in houses. As such they pose a great danger to man. May be therefore, snakes are worshiped on this day. Right from the times when mankind started acquiring some sort of culture, Sun and Snake have been invoked with prayers and ritual worship in most of the countries. In India even before the Vedic times, the tradition of snake-worship was in vogue.

The Legend In ancient India, there lived a clan by the name of "NAGAS" whose culture was highly developed. The Indus Valley civilisation of 3000 B.C. gives ample proof of the popularity of snake-worship amongst the Nagas, whose culture was fairly wide-spread in India even before the Aryans came. After the Naga culture got incorporated into Hinduism, the Indo-Aryans themselves accepted many of the snake deities of the Nagas in their pantheon and some of them even enjoyed a pride of place in the Puranic Hinduism.

The prominent Cobra snakes mentioned in the Puranas are Anant, Vasuki, Shesh, Padma, Kanwal, Karkotak, Kalia, Aswatar, Takshak, Sankhpal, Dhritarashtra and Pingal. Some historians state that these were not snakes but Naga Kings of various regions with immerse power.

The thousand-headed Shesh Nag who symbolises Eternity is the couch of Lord Vishnu. It is on this couch that the Lord reclines between the time of the dissolution of one Universe and creation of another. Hindus believe in the immortality of the snake because of its habit of sloughing its skin. As such Eternity in Hinduism is often represented by a serpent eating its own tail.

It is an age-old religious belief that serpents are loved and blessed by Lord Shiv. May be therefore, he always wears them as ornamentation around his neck. Most of the festivals that fall in the month of Shravan are celebrated in honour of Lord Shiv, whose blessings are sought by devotees, and along with the Lord, snakes are also worshiped. Particularly on the Nag-Panchami day live cobras or their pictures are revered and religious rights are performed to seek their good will. To seek immunity from snake bites, they are bathed with milk, haldi-kumkum is sprinkled on their heads and milk and rice are offered as "naivedya". The Brahmin who is called to do the religious ritual is given "dakshina" in silver or gold coins some times, even a cow is given away as gift.

Important Aspects of Nag Panchami

This so called "snake day" has several important components. In addition to offerings made to the snakes throughout the country during worship and celebration, men and women celebrate the day in these ways:

Cobras are bathed in milk and offered rice as this is thought to offer immunity from their bites. Women often partake in early baths of milk and wear colourful saris. Pots of milk and flowers are placed next to holes that are believed to contain snakes as an offering of devotion. If a snake actually drinks the milk it is thought to be the ultimate sign of good luck. Mansa, the Queen of Snakes, is worshiped in most parts of Bengal during Nag Panchami. In the Punjabi region, a large dough snake is created and then paraded around the village. The parade is colourful with plenty of singing and dancing; at the end of the parade the snake is buried. Nag Panchami is referred to as "Guga-Navami" in Punjab. Snake charmers sit alongside the roads of Maharashtra and encourage women to offer milk, flowers and haldi-kumkum (a powdered offering of tumeric and vermillion) to the dangerous snakes the snake charmers carry. In many villages, snake charmers carry pots containing cobras to a central temple where they are released and then worshiped with offerings of milk and rice. Mainly in the south of India, people worship figures of snakes made of clay or sandalwood as alternatives to the real-life versions. No Hindu home may fry anything on the day of Nag Panchami. Girls who are hoping to marry believe that the cobra offers good luck in their quest for eternal happiness.

u can see more of that festival in the links below :

http://www.festivalsofindia.in/nagp…

http://www.bawarchi.com/festivals/n…

http://www.aryabhatt.com/fast_fair_…

In 2008, Nag Panchami date is on July 23 and August 6. The most widely observed Nag Panchami is the one after Amavasi in Shravan month, which is on August 6, 2008.

Nag Panchami is observed at two different times. It is observed once after Purnima in Shravan month and once after Amavasi in Shravan month. It is observed on the fifth day after Poornima and Amavas.

Manasa Devi, the snake goddess, is worshipped on this day in Bengal, Orissa and several parts of North India. Special idols of Goddess Manasa are made and are worshipped during this period.

Fasting on Nag Panchami

People also observe Vrata – some communities fast during the daytime and eat food only after sunset. Some people avoid salt on the day - food is consumed without salt. Deep fried things are avoided on the day. Some communities in South India have an elaborate oil bath on the day. There is a belief that unmarried women who undertake Nagpanchami Vrat and do the puja and feed snakes will get good husbands.

Nag Panchami is Guga Navami in Punjab and a huge snake is made from flour and is worshipped on this day.

Legend has it that Lord Krishna overpowered the huge black snake Kalia that terrorized his village on this day. The monsoon season is at is peak during the Shravana Month (July – August). The snakes move out of their burrows, which are filled with water, and occupy spaces frequented by human beings. So it is widely believed that Nag Panchami is observed to please the Snake Gods and avoid snake bites during this season.

In many places, two idols of snakes are drawn on both sides of doors using cow dung on this day. Five-hooded idols are worshipped in many regions.

The idol of five-hooded snake is made using mud, turmeric, sandal and saffron. Milk is offered to the snake idols and in some extreme form of worship people feed milk to live cobras.

The festival of Nag Panchami is yet another example of the influence of Mother Nature on Hinduism. It also shows the need for human beings to respect animals, which play an important role in the survival of human beings

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Response from: Mrs. Sai Sai,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Srividya,

You can fast during the daytime and eat food only after sunset. You can eat food avoiding salt. You have to avoid eating deep fried food. You can go to Temple and perform Puja.

You can also see http://www.mypanchang.com/naagpanch…

Naag Panchami or festival of snakes is a unique festival dedicated to honour the Serpent God or Naag Devta. Falling on the fifth day of Shravan in July/August, reverence for the cobra (snakes) are paid.

Fairly widespread before the Aryan invasion, worshipping of snakes or Naga was later incorporated into Hinduism by the Aryan themselves. Hindu Mythological books are famously filled with stories, fables and pictures of snakes.

Lord Vishnu's couch is the green, thousand-headed snake (Ananta or Sesha) who could hold up the earth. Lord Shiva wears a snake for ornamental purpose. Even Lord Krishna is called "Kaliya Mardan" to commemorate his victory over the giant snake, Kaliya.

A farmer while tilling his land incidentally killed some young serpents. The serpent took revenge by biting all members of the farmer's family except his daughter, who worshipped snakes.This devotional act of the girl resulted in revival of her family. So on the day of Naag Panchami, tilling of land is forbidden. Snake worship is however believed to have originated due to man's natural fear of reptiles.

Celebration of Naag Panchami :

One of the oldest and auspicious festivals, women fast on this day. Also, women draw pictures and images of snakes on walls of their houses with a mixture of cowdung, milk and black powder. Offerings of milk, ghee, sweets, water and rice are also made at the sites of snake holes. Devotees consider themselves lucky if snakes drink offered milks. Naag panchami is observed and celebrated in different ways in various parts of India.

It is mainly observed in Southern India, Maharashtra and Bengal. In Jodhpur, huge cloth effigies of the serpents are displayed at major fairs. Also in W.Bengal and parts of Assam and Orissa, the snake deity worshipped on Naga Panchami is the goddess Manasa. In Kerala, huge crowds throng snake temples on this day to worship stone or metal icons of the cosmic serpent Ananta or Sesha.

You can also see this link in ammas.com about how to do Naga Puja

http://www.ammas.com/ar/home.cfm?r=…

Naga Puja :

Mix rice flour with water and make sarpa statue on a clean plate.Do pooja to it with flowers. pour milk(unheated) to it and offer bananas and sesame seeds.Do it in the morning and fast till evening.

You can also see http://www.hindu-blog.com/2008/07/n…

http://www.hindu-blog.com/2008/08/w…

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Response from: B E,   
Featured Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Dear Friend On the fifth day of the bright half of Shravan month of Hindu calendar, people worship the snake or nag. The day is known as Nag Panchami. Nag Panchami has a special significance and is celebrated by the devotees with lot of faith, fear and devotion. It is firmly believed that the serpent lord associated with Lord Subrmanya who will be pleased by this worship will mitigate their sufferings and bring happiness. On this day, people visit temples specially dedicated to snakes and worship them. Nag Panchami is observed in different ways in different parts of India and it is an important all India festival. In Bengal and parts of Assam and Orissa the blessings of Mansa, the queen of serpents are sought by worshipping her in all the religious adoration. In Punjab Nag Panchami is known by the name of "Guga-Navami". A huge snake is shaped from dough, which is kneaded from the contribution of flour and butter from every household. The dough-snake is then placed on a basket and taken round the village in a colorful procession in which women and children sing and dance and onlookers shower flowers. When the procession reaches the main square of the village all the religious rites are performed to invoke the blessings of the snake god and then the dough snake is ceremoniously buried. In Nepal also, Nag Panchami is celebrated by worshipping the Karkotag, Vasuki and Sesh Nag. This is one of the ancient Hindu festivals and has a mention in Hindu Puranas. In Jainism and Buddhism snake is regarded as sacred having divine qualities. It is believed that a cobra snake saved the life of Buddha and another protected the Jain Muni Parshwanath. Today as an evidence of this belief, we find a huge serpent carved above the head of the statue of Muni Parshwanath. In South India, the serpent is given a pride of place and you will find Naga idols installed in almost all temples and even on roadside platforms. It is believed that any harm done to snakes create miseries and sufferings. Serpent worship is very widely followed. The major Hindu gods, Lord Shiva has serpent as an ornament round his neck and Lord Vishnu has serpent Adhisesha as his bed and he is called Seshashayana (person sleeping on snake) The day preceding Nag Panchami i.e. the fourth day of the bright half of Shravan month is called ‘Naga Chauthi’. On this day women take head bath and wearing wet clothes which marks sanctity and divinity, visit the snake pits in the morning. Raw milk and ghee are offered followed by halad (turmeric powder), kumkum, chandan (sandalwood paste), rice and flowers. Prayers are offered for the well being of the families. Those who offer such worship on this day normally undertake fasting on the day. On Nag Panchami, people also make images of snakes using cow dung and place them on either side of the entrance to the house to welcome the snake god. In some families it is also a tradition to keep a silver idol of Serpent in the pooja room and worship by pouring raw milk and ghee, and decorate the idol with halad, kumkum and flowers. Some people have the tradition of making an idol of serpent by mixing ‘chandan’ (sandal wood paste), ‘halad’ (turmeric powder), and ‘kumkum’ (sindhoor), and ‘keshar”’ (saffron) and placed on a metal plate and worshipped. In some families, figures of snakes are drawn with red sandalwood paste on wooden boards, or purchase clay images of snakes coloured yellow or black. These are then worshipped and offered milk, ghee and flowers.

Nag Panchami is also connected with the following legend of Lord Krishna. Young Krishna was playing ball with the other cowboy friends, when suddenly the ball got entangled in the high branch of a tree. Krishna volunteered to climb the tree and fetch the ball. But below the tree the river Yamuna was flowing in full glory, in which the terrible poisonous snake Kalinga was living. Nobody dared to go near that place. Lord Krishna ignoring the warnings of his friends jumps into the water. The dangerous ‘Kalinga” serpent comes up. But Krishna was ready and jumping on the snake’s head, starts dancing on its head. Kalinga realizes the strength of Lord Krishna and pleads with Krishna: “Please, do not kill me.” Krishna takes sympathy on Kalinga and after taking a promise that henceforth he would not harm anybody, he let the snake go free into the river again. Hence, Nag Panchami is also commemorated as a day of victory of Lord Krishna over Kalinga the legendary snake. It is widely believed that snakes like milk. As this is the day of the serpents, devotees pour raw milk into snake pits around the house or near the temples to propitiate them. Sometimes, a small pot of milk with some flowers is placed near the holes of snake pits so that the snakes may drink it. It is firmly believed that if a snake actually drinks the milk, it is considered to be extremely auspicious and the devotees are blessed. Temples devoted to Lord Subramanya (Lord Muruga-Karttikeya) conduct special poojas and prayers on this day and large number of devotees visit such temples to offer prayers. A unique feature in South India is that Nag Panchami is also celebrated as Brother-Sisters Day. On this occasion, brothers visit the houses of their married sisters. Sisters apply milk and ghee on the back of the body of their brothers by using a flower followed by turmeric powder and kumkum. Food and eatables are offered and gifts are given with prayers to serpent Lord to bless their brothers with health, wealth and happiness. This has a very unique social significance which binds the two families. The difference between Nag Panchami and other Hindu festivals like Holi, Diwali, and Navaratri is that Nag Panchami is not associated with pomp and splendor associated with other festivals but celebrated with lots of faith, sanctity and devotion.

Best Regards

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Response from: Geetha Gopakumar,   
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
Naga Panchami is celebrated by Hindus in most parts of India. It is celebrated on Panchami in Shravan month. Naga Panchami (Naga Chauthi)-the festival of snakes is one of the important festivals of Hindus and celebrated all over India to pay respect to snakes. It is celebrated on the fifth day of the moonlit fortnight in the month of Shravana. For 2008, it falls on 6th August, Wednesday. On this day, they worship Naga Devata(Cobras). Cobras are considered divine in Hindu mythology. People go to temples and snake pits and they worship the snakes. They offer milk and silver snake to protect them from all evils. They also fast. This festival is to celebrate the day Lord Krishna defeated the serpent Kalia.

According to another legend the festival of Naga Panchami is celebrated by Hindus to pay respect to Nagas. The five Nagas worshipped on Nag Panchami are Ananta, Vasuki, Taxak, Karkotaka and Pingala. According to a Puranic myth Brahma’s son Kashyapa had four wives. Kashyapa’s first wife gave birth to Devas, second to Garudas, third to Nagas and fourth to Daityas. The third wife of Kashpa was called Kadroo, who gave birth to Nagas. So Nagas are also known as Kadrooja. They were the rulers of Patal-Loka. The prominent Cobra snakes mentioned in the Puranas are Anant, Vasuki, Shesh, Padma, Kanwal, Karkotak, Kalia, Aswatar, Takshak, Sankhpal, Dhritarashtra and Pingal. Some historians state that these were not snakes but Naga Kings of various regions with immerse power.

Naga Panchami is the festival of snakes celebrated on the fifth tithi in the month of Shravan. People visit temples specially dedicated to snakes and worship them. Shiva temples are also favoured places for veneration as snakes are considered dear to him. In South India, people craft images of snakes using cow dung on either side of the entrance to the house to welcome the snake god. Some go to worship the snake which is believed to be hiding in the holes of anthills. Or else a five hood snake is made by mixing “gandh” (a fragrant pigment), “haladi-kumkum” (turmeric powder), “chandan” (sandal) and “kesar” (saffron) and placed on a metal plate and worshipped. This practice of worshipping the snake on this day is related to the following story.

The thousand-headed Shesh Nag who symbolises Eternity is the couch of Lord Vishnu. It is on this couch that the Lord reclines between the time of the dissolution of one Universe and creation of another. Hindus believe in the immortality of the snake because of its habit of sloughing its skin. In many places, two idols of snakes are drawn on both sides of doors using cow dung on this day. Five-hooded idols are worshipped in many regions. The idol of five-hooded snake is made using mud, turmeric, sandal and saffron. Milk is offered to the snake idols and in some extreme form of worship people feed milk to live cobras.

A unique feature in South India is that Nag Panchami is also celebrated as Brother-Sisters Day. On this occasion, brothers visit the houses of their married sisters. Sisters apply milk and ghee on the back of the body of their brothers by using a flower followed by turmeric powder and kumkum. Food and eatables are offered and gifts are given with prayers to serpent Lord to bless their brothers with health, wealth and happiness. This has a very unique social significance which binds the two families.

In South India, the serpent is given a pride of place and you will find Naga idols installed in almost all temples and even on roadside platforms. It is believed that any harm done to snakes create miseries and sufferings. Serpent worship is very widely followed. The major Hindu gods, Lord Shiva has serpent as an ornament round his neck and Lord Vishnu has serpent Adhisesha as his bed and he is called Seshashayana (person sleeping on snake)

The day preceding Nag Panchami i.e. the fourth day of the bright half of Shravan month is called ‘Naga Chauthi’. On this day women take head bath and wearing wet clothes which marks sanctity and divinity, visit the snake pits in the morning. Raw milk and ghee are offered followed by halad (turmeric powder), kumkum, chandan (sandalwood paste), rice and flowers. Prayers are offered for the well being of the families. Those who offer such worship on this day normally undertake fasting on the day.

The difference between Nag Panchami and other Hindu festivals like Holi, Diwali, and Navaratri is that Nag Panchami is not associated with pomp and splendor associated with other festivals but celebrated with lots of faith, sanctity and devotion. http://arulmuruga.org/nag-panchami.…

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Response from: swarna rao makam,   
Featured Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.
hi vidya normally it is fasting only. but nowadays the people or changing so atleast returing from putta {the snake place} u will be in fasting.afternoon u can eat without onion and garlic also nonveg. for the night it is possible take fruits and milk.

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Response from: dowluru harini,   
Council Member on Ask Agent
Source: www.festivalsofindia.in/nagpanchami… - 42k -
hi see the following source link.

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